transgenes

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id10t
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transgenes

Post by id10t » Sun Mar 06, 2011 10:43 pm

What exactly are transgenes. Do we know the specific sequence of them?

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JackBean
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Post by JackBean » Mon Mar 07, 2011 7:02 am

transgenic organisms are GM, i.e. genetically modified, thus you should know at least the sequence of the transgene (the gene transferred into the organism)
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

Cis or trans? That's what matters.

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DRT23
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Post by DRT23 » Mon Mar 07, 2011 6:30 pm

A transgene is a gene which is introduced to a host's genome which does not normally carry that gene. The host is now a GM organism. So, theoretically any gene can be used as a transgene. So, there is not a specific transgene or sequence.

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JackBean
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Post by JackBean » Mon Mar 07, 2011 8:23 pm

that's rigth, but you should know sequence of your transgene :)
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

Cis or trans? That's what matters.

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Post by id10t » Tue Mar 08, 2011 5:09 am

Thanks for the responses guys...I was also wondering if you could use transgenes for immunoprecipitation experiments? If so how would you?

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JackBean
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Post by JackBean » Tue Mar 08, 2011 9:36 am

not sure, whether is it what you mean, but you can produce your protein of interest in some other organism in large amounts and then use it for the immunoprecipitation...
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

Cis or trans? That's what matters.

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Post by id10t » Tue Mar 08, 2011 9:37 pm

Thanks again that clears some things up...one final question I have is...what are the difference between report genes and transgenes?

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Post by canalon » Tue Mar 08, 2011 9:59 pm

Report genes: selectable genes that tell you that the construct has been successfully transferred. Might not have any interest from the point of view of the final product, but convenient in the construction stage. ie antibiotic resistance gene that will allow selection of the plasmid as it is transferred from bacteria to plant during the cloning process.

transgene: your gene of interest. Not necessarily selectable. ie the gene(s) conferring a new metabolic pathway in your final organism are likely to be inactive in a bacterial genome and will not provide any selectable marker to know which of the bacteria has incorporated your plasmid at each of the construction stage.
Patrick

Science has proof without any certainty. Creationists have certainty without
any proof. (Ashley Montague)

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