wrap flower with green cellophane

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kyros
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wrap flower with green cellophane

Post by kyros » Fri Apr 09, 2010 4:25 pm

If we wrap a one flower pot -with a flower of course- with a geen cellophane ensuring good air,moisture and temperature conditions, what do we expect about the development of the flower?
I think that the answer is simple ,but I am not sure...
I don't want to say my opinion because I may affect your answers
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JackBean
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Post by JackBean » Sat Apr 10, 2010 8:57 am

if you ensure sufficient air and water, than it should be fine. I guess your point is, that you put only green light, right?
Well, the plants have also carotenoids, which can absorb at near green spectra, but that depends on your wavelength. The other option are phycocyanin and phycoerythrin, but I thing, these are not present in higher plants.
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

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kyros
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Post by kyros » Sun Apr 11, 2010 1:26 pm

what are phycocyanin and phycoerythrin ??(I am only a greek high scool student I don't now much YET!)
-and yes that was my point...but I think that carotenoids are not enough for the proper development of the flower even if they absorb the whole green light)
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JackBean
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Post by JackBean » Sun Apr 11, 2010 1:41 pm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phycoerythrin
look there for phycocyanin too.

Why not? They are there to transfer the energy to chlorophyll
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Mon Apr 12, 2010 12:03 am

I think this is not the case. There is a difference between how a plant sees light for photosynthesis and how a plant sees light for information purposes.
for photosynthesis, a plant sees light with chlorophyll, and accessory pigments such as phycobillins (carotenoids are sometimes listed as accessory pigments, but the main role of carotenoids is photoprotection, not transfer to cholorophyll).
a plant has a whole different range of methods of detecting light for information purposes: cryptochromes, zeaxhantin and phototropin for blue light and phytochrome for red light. If all the light that a plant can get, then it's just like if the plant was in complete darkness.

Now you have to ask if keeping the plant in darkness is a problem. well it depends on what kind of plant it is. if it is a long day plant, it ca flower in darkness. If it is a short day plant, it can't. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photoperiodism

Plants have signaling pathways too ya know
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