Difference between? Complementaton and Recombination

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doctobe
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Difference between? Complementaton and Recombination

Post by doctobe » Tue Mar 02, 2010 3:47 am

In light of the Complementation test performed by Benzer on T4 phages, what is the difference between complementation and recombination?
(Can you have complementation and not have recombination, can you have complementation and have recombination?

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JackBean
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Post by JackBean » Tue Mar 02, 2010 7:13 am

I think, that complementation and recombination has nothing to do basically.
Recombination is exchange of genetic material between two DNA molecules (chromosomes, plasmids etc.), whereas complementation is process, when you add some gene to compensate for missing endogennous gene.
E.g. bacteria need some osmosensor to grow, so when you have knock-out of it, they are not able to survive (maybe only on osmotic media, not sure now), but when you add some other histidine kinase and it's signal, they are viable. Apparently, because the new HK supplemented bacteria with "osmosensor", but there does not have to be recombination (it can stay on plasmid).
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

Cis or trans? That's what matters.

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Re:

Post by doctobe » Thu Mar 04, 2010 2:59 am

JackBean wrote:I think, that complementation and recombination has nothing to do basically.
Recombination is exchange of genetic material between two DNA molecules (chromosomes, plasmids etc.), whereas complementation is process, when you add some gene to compensate for missing endogennous gene.
E.g. bacteria need some osmosensor to grow, so when you have knock-out of it, they are not able to survive (maybe only on osmotic media, not sure now), but when you add some other histidine kinase and it's signal, they are viable. Apparently, because the new HK supplemented bacteria with "osmosensor", but there does not have to be recombination (it can stay on plasmid).



"How" did HK do this? Did you guess about the HK doing that? How did you prove(or how was it proven) that it was supplemented with the osmosensor"?

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Post by JackBean » Thu Mar 04, 2010 12:20 pm

they are quite similar, so they can supplement each other. This system is commonly used in such situations.
There is system in both E.coli and Saccharomyces
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

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Re:

Post by doctobe » Thu Mar 04, 2010 4:36 pm

JackBean wrote:they are quite similar, so they can supplement each other. This system is commonly used in such situations.
There is system in both E.coli and Saccharomyces


it is the Ecoli system that was given as an example in class. Trying to understand that one. with the B strain K strain.

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Post by JackBean » Fri Mar 05, 2010 8:03 am

that is something different. I'm talking about histidine kinases, which work as receptors and thus, if you have knock-out of one of them, you can supplement it with plant histidine kinase
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

Cis or trans? That's what matters.

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Re:

Post by doctobe » Fri Mar 05, 2010 6:12 pm

JackBean wrote:that is something different. I'm talking about histidine kinases, which work as receptors and thus, if you have knock-out of one of them, you can supplement it with plant histidine kinase

I went to my teacher yesterday and it seems I was remembering examples versus concepts. I though Ecoli was used as an example but it turns it out that is was specific to Ecoli and not to every system.
NOw trying to unlearn somethings and regroup my thoughts. Thanks for replying.

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Post by JackBean » Mon Mar 08, 2010 6:39 am

with the T4 phages you can probably use only E.coli, but I gave you another example, from my work, where can be used either E.coli or yeast
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

Cis or trans? That's what matters.

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