Is it possible to max out the gene pool?

Genetics as it applies to evolution, molecular biology, and medical aspects.

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JackBean
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Post by JackBean » Thu Jan 21, 2010 10:26 am

You had to keep them in the same enviroment, because the quantitative traits can be influenced by enviroment as well
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

Cis or trans? That's what matters.

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mith
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Post by mith » Fri Jan 22, 2010 8:45 pm

I think the resources needed for an amount of individuals to exceed the amount of variations in the genepool is considerably larger than you'd think. But as long as we're dealing with the "infinite" universe, then yes supposedly somewhere there's another planet identical to earth and there's another "you" asking the same question at this very moment.
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f24u7
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Post by f24u7 » Tue Feb 16, 2010 9:52 pm

ok you guys have to forgive my lack of understanding in genetics, so here's my perception

human genome occupies a total of just over 3 billion DNA base pairs, so the maximum combination of human gene sequence is the factorial of 3 billion, the actual number is probably smaller than that since some sequence might not work, or might not even be human, but the point is that if my assumption that the actual maximum gene combination will not exceed 3 billion factorial, than this number is a finite number, and if we continue to factor in the effect of the gene mutation (no exactly sure the calculation) it will still be a finite number (let's call it x), therefore if our population greatly exceeds that x, say 2x, there must be two individual to possess the exact same gene sequence, hence having two individual looking the same

please correct me if any of my logic is wrong

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biohazard
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Re:

Post by biohazard » Wed Feb 17, 2010 7:43 am

f24u7 wrote:ok you guys have to forgive my lack of understanding in genetics, so here's my perception

human genome occupies a total of just over 3 billion DNA base pairs, so the maximum combination of human gene sequence is the factorial of 3 billion, the actual number is probably smaller than that since some sequence might not work, or might not even be human, but the point is that if my assumption that the actual maximum gene combination will not exceed 3 billion factorial, than this number is a finite number, and if we continue to factor in the effect of the gene mutation (no exactly sure the calculation) it will still be a finite number (let's call it x), therefore if our population greatly exceeds that x, say 2x, there must be two individual to possess the exact same gene sequence, hence having two individual looking the same

please correct me if any of my logic is wrong


That isn't quite so. The length of the genome is not exact, so in theory you could have any number of base pairs, which basically makes the number of possible genomes indefinite :)

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Re: Re:

Post by f24u7 » Wed Feb 17, 2010 8:37 pm

biohazard wrote:
f24u7 wrote:ok you guys have to forgive my lack of understanding in genetics, so here's my perception

human genome occupies a total of just over 3 billion DNA base pairs, so the maximum combination of human gene sequence is the factorial of 3 billion, the actual number is probably smaller than that since some sequence might not work, or might not even be human, but the point is that if my assumption that the actual maximum gene combination will not exceed 3 billion factorial, than this number is a finite number, and if we continue to factor in the effect of the gene mutation (no exactly sure the calculation) it will still be a finite number (let's call it x), therefore if our population greatly exceeds that x, say 2x, there must be two individual to possess the exact same gene sequence, hence having two individual looking the same

please correct me if any of my logic is wrong


That isn't quite so. The length of the genome is not exact, so in theory you could have any number of base pairs, which basically makes the number of possible genomes indefinite :)



wait, so the genome is not exact? can you elaborate, i'm a bit confuse,

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Re: Re:

Post by biohazard » Thu Feb 18, 2010 7:06 am

f24u7 wrote:wait, so the genome is not exact? can you elaborate, i'm a bit confuse,


The genome is not exact in terms of nucleotide sequence. That is why you and me are different. This also includes changes in nucleotide numbers, because a genome may contain deletions or duplications after mutations, or it may contain even extra genes if, say, a retrovirus has inserted its genome inside the host chromosome.

Even relatively big genetic differences may go unnoticed if they are located within the non-coding regions of the chromosome. Mutations happen in coding regions as well, and the exact type and location of a given mutation determine its effects and its chances to remain in the gene pool, further altering our genomes.

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