Thinking about embarking on a Career in Biology

Debate and discussion of any biological questions not pertaining to a particular topic.

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Newman
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Thinking about embarking on a Career in Biology

Post by Newman » Wed Dec 23, 2009 1:50 am

Ever since college I've wanted to do something in zoology/biology. I majored in Parks/Rec Management in college and that got me close to my love for the outdoors, our parks system, and ecology. But I've always craved to study more on the scientific side. Well one thing leads to another and now I'm in my mid 30's and work full time as a Quality Assurance Analyst at a software company. It's nice and all but it may not be quite what I want to do for the rest of my life. I'm thinking about making a shift to an Environmental Biology Grad degree (I'm interested in enviro biology field work, research, and ecology). I'm short on some Chemistry pre-requisites and maybe another biology course. I may take those classes this year and then apply to a grad school after that. But before I embark on this journey it'd be nice to get a feel of the possibilities out there.

How's the environmental biology/zoology field looking right now? I'm sure I'll have to do some grunt work for a little while before securing a stable position, right? I just got married and may be starting up a family soon, I just want to make sure I can provide support.

I really want to get out there and do some field work and research. With that in mind what should I expect as I'm about to apply for a grad degree?

Are there any other career switchers out there? Anyone trying to work full time and go to school at the same time? Please share some stories and advice.

Thank you very much
Newman

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Post by Endangered » Fri Jan 01, 2010 1:56 am

Well Newman, the big conundrum with field work is that no one likes to hire MS or PhDs to do the actual work(too pricey). They sometimes hire guys like me with a BS in Biology and 13 years of experience, but more and more they employ students and even volunteers to gather field data. They call it partnering...I call it ruining your data set in an attempt to save a few dollars.

While working on your MS you'll certainly get to do field work, particularly if you can be creative in your grant writing. Once you have the MS or PhD, look to be chained to a desk and melded into an Excell spreadsheet until your consciousness dissolves.

Ok, it's not that bad, but you get the gist.

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