Question for Biologists and Mathematicians

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rimblock
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Question for Biologists and Mathematicians

Post by rimblock » Mon Dec 14, 2009 12:31 pm

Hi,
On the basis that the rules for atomic interaction haven't changed since the big bang occured, if the right atoms came together 13.4 billion years ago, we could have existed almost at the dawn of the universe (environmental requirements aside). So is 13.4 billion years slow or fast for 'the right atoms to have come together to form us' - probabilistically speaking?!

It's a bit wierd to think that our 'unique' bodies are created by a set of chemical reactions, whose rules were decided at/ before the big bang!

Cheers.

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Post by mith » Mon Dec 14, 2009 9:19 pm

You need to know more about the universe to make that kind of estimation, otherwise your answer would be between impossible and highly likely depending on how you weigh different events.
Living one day at a time;
Enjoying one moment at a time;
Accepting hardships as the pathway to peace;
~Niebuhr

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Post by Eous » Mon Dec 14, 2009 9:46 pm

probability won't really give you the answer of whether this is fast or slow. suppose that probability suggests that the event of things coming together, as you say, is a 1 in 20 billion years chance. meaning that in 20 billion years, 1 of those years is likely to have the event. but it doesn't have to be the 20 billionth year that it would happen on. It could happen on the first and the probability hasn't been contested.

and remember, the event of all of the necessary particles coming together only needs to happen once for the eventuality of you asking that question.

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Re:

Post by rimblock » Fri Dec 18, 2009 11:58 am

mith wrote:You need to know more about the universe to make that kind of estimation, otherwise your answer would be between impossible and highly likely depending on how you weigh different events.

I agree i do need to know more! It is funny though that the rules that govern you, the way your dna molecules behave/ are interpreted, etc were written billions of years ago. You might try to blame your parents (not you personally!), but it's not their fault. Blame the Big Bang.

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Re:

Post by rimblock » Fri Dec 18, 2009 11:59 am

Eous wrote:probability won't really give you the answer of whether this is fast or slow. suppose that probability suggests that the event of things coming together, as you say, is a 1 in 20 billion years chance. meaning that in 20 billion years, 1 of those years is likely to have the event. but it doesn't have to be the 20 billionth year that it would happen on. It could happen on the first and the probability hasn't been contested.

and remember, the event of all of the necessary particles coming together only needs to happen once for the eventuality of you asking that question.

It was inevitable, as was this answer.

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