Allele replication during interphase

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SheffieldWednesdayFC
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Allele replication during interphase

Post by SheffieldWednesdayFC » Thu Sep 17, 2009 5:15 am

Hei everyone,

I was wondering where the alleles are copied to during Interphase. Suppose on a human (diploid cell), you have a pair of genes (A and a). After they replicate, you get two sets of sister chromatids. Do the genes replicate and then randomly attach to another gene? or does it replicate right onto the template strand?

I think because of DNA polymerase, the strand replicates as it slides along the template. But I'm just making sure.

Thanks

david23
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Post by david23 » Fri Sep 18, 2009 9:41 pm

yes nothing happens, if this is mitosis, then no switching will ever happen. Meiosis however, has the switching thing

Cat
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Post by Cat » Sat Sep 19, 2009 4:26 pm

Genes do not "replicate and then randomly attach to another gene"! The whole chromosomes get replicated, not individual genes!

Also, the "switching thing" is presume is recombination? Why not refer to it by the proper name? Although it is predominant in meiosis and fairly rare in mitosis, it does occur. Read up on somatic recombination...

SheffieldWednesdayFC
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Post by SheffieldWednesdayFC » Sun Sep 20, 2009 12:05 am

ok thanks. I understand it's the whole chromosome that gets replicated.
But there's another concept I don't quite get in Mitosis.

In Mitosis, for a diploid cell, each chromosome in a pair gets replicated. So, from A and a becomes AA and aa. But unlike Meiosis, the pair of chromosomes don't face each other, but all line up on the same plane in the equator. How does the cell know how to pull one of the "A"'s with an "a" so that it is like the original cell?
If you don't know the answer to why, is THIS why Mitosis doesn't have crossing over of genes?

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JackBean
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Post by JackBean » Tue Sep 22, 2009 7:34 am

yes, this is, why there is no crossing-over in mitosis and the cell recognise it easily, because it takes every paire of chromosomes (AA, not AAaa ;) ) as one chromosome, they are connected and when they shall, they dosconnect and every goes to another daughter cell ;)
http://www.biolib.cz/en/main/

Cis or trans? That's what matters.

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