is it too late?(sorry might be off topic)

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candy2000
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is it too late?(sorry might be off topic)

Post by candy2000 » Thu Aug 13, 2009 3:33 am

I'm not sure but i think this might be off topic but i really do need help.

I'm starting college and i want to study Bio. and i wanted to know if its too late? i mean i took it in high school but my teacher didn't teach anything n i mean it...she just came and sit and talked abt nothing abt bio just talked with the students(yeah i knw no one should have her as a teacher).. and I don't know much about it so..is it too late?? if not(hopefully) what do I need to study first? where do i start off? do i need to start with the human body? cells? etc.
I have no idea where to start off..(i would like to do some independent study)
Sorry i knw this is a stupid question but i really have no idea... :oops:



thanks

Giovanni
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Re: is it too late?(sorry might be off topic)

Post by Giovanni » Thu Aug 13, 2009 7:19 am

Guess it depends on what the pre-requisites are for the Bio course you're looking at undertaking. Take a look through the College Website and the specific course and see what kind of background knowledge you need. Also good place to check would be to phone the Bio department in the college you're looking into and have a chat - they want students to go to their college so they're generally very helpful with these kind of things. I'm in Aus so maybe a bit different but the Bio knowledge I gained from High School (Aus remember - pre college/ university studies) was simply covered in greater detail in the first year subjects. Grab any general Bio book from your library and have a look through -Cells, Kingdom Classification are all good starting points. Good luck!!

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jonmoulton
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Re: is it too late?(sorry might be off topic)

Post by jonmoulton » Thu Aug 13, 2009 3:29 pm

Giovanni's advice is good. I'll add some additional ideas. In the USA, Bio majors usually start with the 200-level general biology year series. If you feel you need some "remedial bio", you could take the non-major's 100-level series, which covers much the same information but not in as much depth. One advantage of that strategy is that you will decrease your bio workload a bit and you can use that first year to get through your year of general chemistry with more time to focus on the chem (which you will likely need). However, this will slow your program. If you are doing well in the first year of studies, you might be able to convince some profs to waive the prerequisite for some 300-level bio classes (most require a year of 200-level bio) and take the 200-level major's bio concurrently with some 300-level courses. No matter how you look at it, starting with the non-major's survey (100-level series) will slow you down a bit, but by taking that along with your chemistry and math you can use that first year to clear away a lot of other prerequisites for higher-division courses (prerequisites like chem, physics, mathematics) and by negotiating to get some 300-level bio in your second year, you can minimize the degree to which taking that extra year-series will slow you down.

Subscribe to Scientific American today. Start reading all the bio articles every month. Go to the library and read some back issues, especially articles on bio (proteins, DNA, immunology, ecology, taxonomy, neuroscience, etc. etc.). That's a good introduction to the language of biology and will give you a leg-up on your first year of college-level study.

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Post by jyaron » Fri Aug 14, 2009 2:13 am

It couldn't hurt to go traveling Wikipedia a bit too to get familiar with the terms used in the biological sciences.

Like jonmoulton said, you'll likely get "refreshers" in your entry-level courses in biology. Even Bio-majors have to take general biology and they don't expect you to go in knowing a ton. Just understand the basic idea behind Cell Theory and simple physiology. You don't need to be a biologist to be an undergraduate in biology.
Experience: Cell Biology, Confocal Microscopy, Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Biology, Genetics, Genomics, Physiology

candy2000
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Post by candy2000 » Sun Aug 16, 2009 9:59 pm

Thank you so much guys for the help!!! I really needed it!! :)

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