Flowers

Plants!

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Karen
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Post by Karen » Thu Jul 07, 2005 7:14 pm

Never can have too much info. So when plants get a red sun tan is that all carotens at work, or is anthocyanins also at work. I have this written down in my notes some where, but my notes are a mess... so please enlighten me.
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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Thu Jul 07, 2005 7:22 pm

Sun tan? I assume you mean what happens when petals are red...
When there are 2 main types of carotenoid pigments: caroten and xantofiles. Caroten is orange, xantofiles are yellow
So yes, there is a combination of the effects of carotenoid and anthocian pigments
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Post by Karen » Thu Jul 07, 2005 7:33 pm

no no I mean the leaves... again I am probably only again thinking orchids where many species needs to get a slight red sheen to the leaves to get enough light to flower, just the point before sun burn. Guess I shall have to go throug my notes to find out with pigment type is involved, just have to find them. The color is produced to protect the plants from excessive light and I am pretty sure it is the carotens.

Though anthocyanins are usually, in flowers at least, found in the epidermal layer and thus it would make more sense for the plant to block out excessive light as "early" as possible. But I need to look it up again....
Regards/ Karen

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mith
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Post by mith » Thu Jul 07, 2005 8:06 pm

yep the carotenes protect the leaves and also transfer energy to the chlorophyll
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Karen
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Post by Karen » Thu Jul 07, 2005 9:19 pm

Thanks, so carotens do produce a bit of energy, which is in the end used to make energy for the plant to grow on... this is inline with what I recall having read.

I tend to read a lot but since I dont know anybody interested in this stuff I tend to forget, I need to talk about it for it to get stuck in my head. But my colleagues think I am crazy when I read reports butterflies as indicators of botanical diversity or any other subject that strikes my fancy. So much to read and so little time.

So when and why are anthocanins to be found in the leaves, sorry if I am drifting of subject or are they never found in this part plant - restricted only to the flowers?
Regards/ Karen

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opuntia
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Post by opuntia » Fri Jul 08, 2005 7:57 am

I have seen a flower that has white colour in the morning,pink in the afternoon and maroon in the evening [after that it shrivels].Can any of you explain me this sequence of colour change?
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Post by victor » Fri Jul 08, 2005 8:11 am

Maybe that's because of changes in pigment gradient relative to sunlight/temperature.
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Post by Karen » Fri Jul 08, 2005 8:19 am

or a natural change in the pH as the flowers mature, which could change the color. But newly opened flowers dont always have all their color at once, some takes a few days to get full "structure" and color (more mass=better color). So it could probably be many mechanismes. Was it really pure white? Sounds like an interesting flower - any chance you remember which species/genus?
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opuntia
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Post by opuntia » Fri Jul 08, 2005 8:48 am

Karen wrote: Was it really pure white?

yeah ...100% pure white :lol:


Karen wrote: any chance you remember which species/genus?

Most unfortunately i don't remember that but i'm trying to find...as soon as i find any info. about it i'll let you know :)
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opuntia
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Post by opuntia » Fri Jul 08, 2005 12:59 pm

Lantana is one specieswhich changes it's colour from pure white to violet and some times to yellow too.I still haven't found anything about the other flower about which i've posted before :(
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Post by Karen » Fri Jul 08, 2005 3:49 pm

Aparently changing color is not an uncommon strategy. This links tells a a little bit about why, but not why. It might be worth trying to find some of the articles listed, but I have my hand filled with jut reading basic books.

http://bioserver.georgetown.edu/faculty ... lcolor.htm
Regards/ Karen

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