Integral proteins

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thewax
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Integral proteins

Post by thewax » Mon Apr 20, 2009 3:16 am

Note: This is not a homework question. I am just trying to understand the mechanism of integral proteins.

Question: We know integral proteins have nonpolar regions inside. But are integral proteins like channels (which have a tunnel inside) or are they like pumps or are they not hollow and cannot particles/molecules cannot move through them into/outside of the cell??????????????????? Can particles actually pass through them or not????????????

Research: My book and wiki seems to not explain this point (check wiki at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integral_membrane_protein ). So I turned here.

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Inuyasha
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Post by Inuyasha » Mon Apr 20, 2009 5:31 am

Depends on what type of protein your talking about. You have multiple types. Pumps, channels, etc. Do you have any particular integral protein in mind. You can protein sequence it and see the nonpolar regions.
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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Mon Apr 20, 2009 1:53 pm

integral protein is just a term for a protein that is embedded in both leaflets of the lipid bilayer. integral proteins can be pumps, they can be channels, they can have nothing to do with pumping at all - they can be receptors, adhesion proteins etc etc etc
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