Defective genes & treatments Question?

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rosarioduniam89
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Defective genes & treatments Question?

Post by rosarioduniam89 » Sat Jan 10, 2009 7:57 pm

so here is the question that is being asked;

How can knowing the location of a defective gene assist in developing future products or treatments for that gene?

My answer;

Knowing the location of a defective gene can make understanding it and treating it more likely, for instance, in Amniocentesis a hollow needle is inserted into the uterus to obtain some of the fluid surrounding a fetus. The cells are then examined to find abnormalities in the chromosomes. This can help a doctor better diagnose what might be wrong with the baby and start the treatment at an early stage.

---- I don't think my answer is on point though, it's really vague. and kind of drifts towards Amniocentesis because I haven't found much when doing research for it... any suggestions?

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GreenDog
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Post by GreenDog » Sun Jan 11, 2009 6:24 pm

This is a good answer but not quite fits the question, I think.
in my opinion knowing the chromosomal location of a gene allows us start treatment on the genetic level. For example:
1. If we are talking about a dominant negative phenotype knowing the location of the gene allows us to prevent transcription by affection the promoter region and thus treating the phenomenon.
2. it is also possible to employ "gene therapy" replacing the defective sequence with a valid one by homologous recombination (no a very good idea, but ok for homework)
I'm sure it's possible to come up with more
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rosarioduniam89
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Re:

Post by rosarioduniam89 » Sun Jan 11, 2009 11:46 pm

GreenDog wrote:This is a good answer but not quite fits the question, I think.
in my opinion knowing the chromosomal location of a gene allows us start treatment on the genetic level. For example:
1. If we are talking about a dominant negative phenotype knowing the location of the gene allows us to prevent transcription by affection the promoter region and thus treating the phenomenon.
2. it is also possible to employ "gene therapy" replacing the defective sequence with a valid one by homologous recombination (no a very good idea, but ok for homework)
I'm sure it's possible to come up with more



thanks this really helped round up my answer

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