molecular weight

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sara
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molecular weight

Post by sara » Mon Jun 27, 2005 4:44 pm

good morning/ good night

my questions are :

why we should to adjest pH? why EDTA tris and trisHcL need nearly pH8 .

if i want to remove secondry metabolics like polysaccharide what is better to use NaCL or ammonium acetate and why?

why not all DNA plants have the same bp ? some have 50,000 bp and other 24,000 bp.


all the best

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mith
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Post by mith » Mon Aug 15, 2005 4:23 am

Plants are different, why should they have the same base pairs?
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Dr.Stein
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Post by Dr.Stein » Mon Aug 15, 2005 10:05 am

pH adjusting is necessary because it will create a favorable environment which such substance, for instance enzyme, will work properly.
For example, Tris-HCl should be adjusted into pH 7.5 to get the optimal DNase and RNase activity in your assays.
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Post by paperclip » Mon Aug 15, 2005 12:56 pm

pH adjusting is necessary because it will create a favorable
environment which such substance, for instance enzyme, will work
properly.
For example, Tris-HCl should be adjusted into pH 7.5 to get the
optimal DNase and RNase activity in your assays.

OK.

What happens if we're to alter the PH. Does it mean that inductiion
and resonance does not operate efficiently rendering the protein in
question to cross fire all the electrophiles and nucleophiles in the
wrong order and sequences such tat we can get a more than active
enzyme?

What is very basic or acidic medium of PH?

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Post by chemistry_freako » Mon Aug 15, 2005 1:11 pm

Hmm dun quite get ur question..
化学は、最高です

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paperclip
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Post by paperclip » Mon Aug 15, 2005 1:53 pm

Suppose we throw in some alcohol and raise the pH?

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Post by paperclip » Mon Aug 15, 2005 2:33 pm

Alcohols may undergo a wide range of reactions. The presence of an oxygen atom with its two pairs of electrons means that alcohols may act as nucleophiles. However, amongst the most important reactions are those which lead to the loss of water (dehydration reactions), and those which lead to the formation of carbonyl compounds (oxidation reactions).

Theres some more... about a citric acid and then also about alcohol dehydrogenases which catalyses some reactions.

I think that rattles it off.

Does anyone have a website on these things?

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Dr.Stein
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Post by Dr.Stein » Mon Aug 15, 2005 3:15 pm

paperclip wrote:What happens if we're to alter the PH. Does it mean that inductiion
and resonance does not operate efficiently rendering the protein in
question to cross fire all the electrophiles and nucleophiles in the
wrong order and sequences such tat we can get a more than active
enzyme?

What is very basic or acidic medium of PH?

Now I realize that my English is so poor :(
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sdekivit
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Re: molecular weight

Post by sdekivit » Mon Aug 15, 2005 3:42 pm

sara wrote:good morning/ good night

my questions are :

why we should to adjest pH? why EDTA tris and trisHcL need nearly pH8 .

if i want to remove secondry metabolics like polysaccharide what is better to use NaCL or ammonium acetate and why?

why not all DNA plants have the same bp ? some have 50,000 bp and other 24,000 bp.


all the best


it depends on the environment the plant lives in. This alters the DNA profile of a plant, because it needs for example an extra enzyme or something because it lives on a different ground. Als plants that live at higher temperatures will contain more GT bp because this increases the melting point of the DNA.

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Post by MrMistery » Mon Aug 15, 2005 8:56 pm

There are no such things as GT pairs. I assume you mean GC pairs. Yes it is true that more GC pairs increase the melting point of DNA, but no plant lives in any environment that even comes close to the temperature of DNA melting. The DNA structure is based on it's utilities, it isn't decided so it would have a higher melting point.
The very different number of base pairs from species to species is decided by evolution along milions and milions of years from the first organism, then the first plant. As it has been said, the environment plays the main role here, each species is continuosly adapting via mutationzzz....
Regards,
Andrew
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Post by sdekivit » Tue Aug 16, 2005 4:55 pm

MrMistery wrote:There are no such things as GT pairs. I assume you mean GC pairs. Yes it is true that more GC pairs increase the melting point of DNA, but no plant lives in any environment that even comes close to the temperature of DNA melting. The DNA structure is based on it's utilities, it isn't decided so it would have a higher melting point.
The very different number of base pairs from species to species is decided by evolution along milions and milions of years from the first organism, then the first plant. As it has been said, the environment plays the main role here, each species is continuosly adapting via mutationzzz....
Regards,
Andrew


:oops: i meant GC (shame on me)

i don't know anything about plants. Only the DNA here.

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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Wed Aug 17, 2005 8:53 pm

Lol. No prob man, since this is molecular biology forum not botany. But in this particular problem we can not isolate the 2...
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter

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