Actin filiments role in ameoboid movement

About microscopic forms of life, including Bacteria, Archea, protozoans, algae and fungi. Topics relating to viruses, viroids and prions also belong here.

Moderators: Leonid, amiradm, BioTeam

Post Reply
Thonzo
Garter
Garter
Posts: 7
Joined: Mon Jul 28, 2008 12:13 am

Actin filiments role in ameoboid movement

Post by Thonzo » Sun Oct 05, 2008 2:01 pm

I know that during amoeboid movement the cytogel of the ectoplasm is converted to cytosol and is forced to the cells perifery at a localized area forming a hylane cap which than extends into a pseudopod. I also know that actin filimanst of the cytoskelceton play a role in converting cytosol into cytogel and vice versa. what i would like to know is how this process actualy works is it in anyway similar to the role actin plays during muscle contraction if not how so.

User avatar
MrMistery
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
Posts: 6832
Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 10:18 pm
Location: Romania(small and unimportant country)
Contact:

Post by MrMistery » Mon Oct 06, 2008 4:36 am

yes in that it does involve myosin moving on actin. No in that it is not the same mechanism. In amoebae, it is the rearranging of the actin filaments that makes the pseudopodia extend out of the cell, as I remember. In the cytosol they are arranged like a mesh, but in the pseudopodia they are arranged to extend outwards.
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter

Thonzo
Garter
Garter
Posts: 7
Joined: Mon Jul 28, 2008 12:13 am

Post by Thonzo » Mon Oct 06, 2008 11:55 pm

So when the cytoplasm is in the form of cytogel the actin arrangement is some what conpact holding it together in a gel-like form, and when the actin filimants extend they become somewhat less conpact allowing its transformation into cytosol ?

User avatar
MrMistery
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
Posts: 6832
Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 10:18 pm
Location: Romania(small and unimportant country)
Contact:

Post by MrMistery » Tue Oct 07, 2008 7:38 pm

when it is in a gel the actin filaments are randomly oriented, creating a disordered network. When it forms filaments they are ordered, and give shape...
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter

aryan79
Garter
Garter
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Mar 09, 2009 2:30 pm

Post by aryan79 » Mon Mar 09, 2009 2:36 pm

but how this actin and myosin are works in Physarum polycephalum please if u know the ans.it really confused me now i can not undrestand it

User avatar
MrMistery
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
Posts: 6832
Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 10:18 pm
Location: Romania(small and unimportant country)
Contact:

Post by MrMistery » Wed Mar 11, 2009 4:21 am

well i am guessing just like in any amoeba. this is a conserved mechanism that is present even in human white blood cells and some glial cells.
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter

mace
Garter
Garter
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Mar 09, 2009 3:31 pm

Re:

Post by mace » Wed Mar 11, 2009 4:30 am

MrMistery wrote:well i am guessing just like in any amoeba. this is a conserved mechanism that is present even in human white blood cells and some glial cells.


check you private email, MrMistery.thanks for replying to my emails. i only came to this forum for a short while,and i will not be staying long,because i am so busy these days.no need to write back but please reply.
thanks for your time.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests