Transport across a cell membrane - Dissolution?

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Donk
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Transport across a cell membrane - Dissolution?

Post by Donk » Mon May 12, 2008 11:19 pm

Please help me .................

I'm a newbie to biology and have just finished an assignment on the human cell/tissues/systems etc...
In this assignment, transport across a cell membrane had to be described - I used diffusion, osmosis, active & filtration - no probs there.

My problem came with 'Dissolution' - This was described in one of my books for fatty substances too big to diffuse and so they dissolve in the lipid part of the membrane - I thought I had understood this quite well.
My tutor looked over my paper and said that she had never heard of 'Dissolution' and to bring the book - which I will do.

At the moment I am left very confused - I have searched the web for hours and don't know if i'm looking in the right places or not, but can only find 'Dissolution' when it comes to drugs passing over the membrane.

Has anyone else heard of this?
Is my book wrong?
Or does it come under something else - if so, would it be classed as passive or active transport?

Please help if you can :?

Cat
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Post by Cat » Tue May 13, 2008 3:30 am

Dissolution is the opposite of precipitation - one substance dissolves in another (like solute in solution). It is chemical terminology.
In part of membrane transport, it works well for things like cholesterol. In which case cholesterol becomes part of the membrane and only upon dissolution is released from it. It is not really a mechanism of membrane transport but it is definitely part of the process.

Donk
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Re: Transport across a cell membrane - Dissolution?

Post by Donk » Tue May 13, 2008 3:54 pm

:D Thank you so much Cat for your reply - I think i'm understanding and will try some further reading on it :wink:

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