Effects of basic solution on photosynthesis

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Effects of basic solution on photosynthesis

Post by nav » Thu Feb 07, 2008 10:51 pm

Hello,

I have (hopefully) a fairly straightforward question for you guys: what is the effect of a basic solution on photosynthesis? I've read through
http://biology-online.org/articles/ecological_alarm_oceans_turning.html and, form my understanding, an increase of carbon dioxide dissolved in water makes it more acidic. But, what if we were to go the other way? What effect would that have on photosynthesis? Is that measurable?

Now, suppose I have sort of regular garden plant that likes a pH from 5-7. What if, instead of watering it with water (pH 7) but with, let's say, a Barium Hydroxide solution or Sodium Hydroxide solution (with a pH of 10), how would that effect the photosynthetic ability of the plant? I've been searching around on the 'net but there seems to be more info on acidic solutions rather that basic ones. Thanks for reading and I look forward to the responses.

Regards,

Nav

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MichaelXY
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Post by MichaelXY » Fri Feb 08, 2008 1:28 am


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mith
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Post by mith » Fri Feb 08, 2008 4:28 am

the first thing that would be affected would be nutrient absorption thru the roots. Photosynthetic ability is the least of your worries if you're watering with sodium hydroxide.
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Re: Effects of basic solution on photosynthesis

Post by nav » Fri Feb 08, 2008 1:33 pm

Thank you for the response. Hmm, I'd like to test this. What sort of plant do you recommend trying this out on? Thanks in advance.

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MichaelXY
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Post by MichaelXY » Sat Feb 09, 2008 1:27 am

I suppose the plant type would depend on what you plan to test for and how.

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Post by mith » Sat Feb 09, 2008 1:53 am

ideally if you're testing photosynthetic effects, you'd pick one that does it the fastest for quicker results. But usually the constraints are cost and availability.
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Post by MrMistery » Sun Feb 24, 2008 8:21 pm

if you are looking for pH effects on photosynthesis I would recommend algae or aquatic plants such as Elodea canadensis.
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter

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