Attempt 3...

Plants!

Moderators: honeev, Leonid, amiradm, BioTeam

Post Reply
negativefx14
Garter
Garter
Posts: 34
Joined: Sat Jan 12, 2008 5:00 pm

Attempt 3...

Post by negativefx14 » Sun Jan 13, 2008 11:01 pm

Okay, many of you have helped me come up with ideas to test for photorespiration, and helped me get an idea of how to design my lab.

But ive had to scrap the idea again.

So ive come up with the idea of doing a basic photosynthesis test, and testing when that is at its peak under different conditions.

Well, ive decided to do stuff with chromatography and what not. and just test the effects of light intensity, wavelength, and temperature on the outcome.

Then one is able assume that when photosynthesis is not as active, then photorespiration is occuring more frequently.

Beacuse photorespiration occurs more often when those 3 variables are introduced.

I dont know if im even heading in the right direction at this point, can anyone verify any of this?

Also, for anyone who is reading for the first time, I am required to design a lab on photorespiration, and I must be able to acquire data. I do not have to do the lab, only design it.

Using the isotopes is far above my knowledge and understanding.

User avatar
mith
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
Posts: 5345
Joined: Thu Jan 20, 2005 8:14 pm
Location: Nashville, TN
Contact:

Post by mith » Sun Jan 13, 2008 11:38 pm

"Then one is able assume that when photosynthesis is not as active, then photorespiration is occuring more frequently."

No, example:
if you use light in the "green" wavelength, you would have decreased photosynthesis but it cannot be attributed to photorespiration...because the actual reason is that you don't have enough energy for photolysis.
Living one day at a time;
Enjoying one moment at a time;
Accepting hardships as the pathway to peace;
~Niebuhr

negativefx14
Garter
Garter
Posts: 34
Joined: Sat Jan 12, 2008 5:00 pm

Post by negativefx14 » Mon Jan 14, 2008 12:11 am

Wow, I honestly cant figure out a lab for this then...

Its' a design, but I cant be using like radioactive isotopes...

And all the other suggestions I've gotten were good, but I cant seem to comprehend them for some reason.

If anyone would be so kind to maybe explain it or maybe even dumb it down a bit, i'd be very grateful.

negativefx14
Garter
Garter
Posts: 34
Joined: Sat Jan 12, 2008 5:00 pm

Post by negativefx14 » Mon Jan 14, 2008 12:23 am

I was thinking just observe the stomata, and watch it close under certain conditions? Would that work? And if so, how would I make data out of that?

User avatar
MrMistery
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
Posts: 6832
Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 10:18 pm
Location: Romania(small and unimportant country)
Contact:

Post by MrMistery » Mon Jan 14, 2008 12:36 am

you can observe the stomata, but i don't see how that would help you draw any conclusions about photorespiration. Your initial idea is OK, but only use temperature. Photorespiration occurs because at high temperature Rubisco is an oxigenase more than a carboxylase.
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter

negativefx14
Garter
Garter
Posts: 34
Joined: Sat Jan 12, 2008 5:00 pm

Post by negativefx14 » Mon Jan 14, 2008 12:54 am

So, should I just focus on the enzyme, and not worry so much about the plant itself?

Because arent the two competing for the active site of the enzyme?

User avatar
MrMistery
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
Posts: 6832
Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 10:18 pm
Location: Romania(small and unimportant country)
Contact:

Post by MrMistery » Mon Jan 14, 2008 12:50 pm

yes they are. Actually i was suggesting to focus on the plant and not worry so much about the enzyme.
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter

negativefx14
Garter
Garter
Posts: 34
Joined: Sat Jan 12, 2008 5:00 pm

Post by negativefx14 » Mon Jan 14, 2008 5:25 pm

Another question, why eaxtly does temperature make Rubisco an oxigenase more than a carboxylase?

User avatar
MrMistery
Inland Taipan
Inland Taipan
Posts: 6832
Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 10:18 pm
Location: Romania(small and unimportant country)
Contact:

Post by MrMistery » Mon Jan 14, 2008 8:26 pm

no answer to such a question i think. At high temperature the 3D shape of the enzyme active site is closer to oxygen than to CO2
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests