Repiratory poisons

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Ineedhelp
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Repiratory poisons

Post by Ineedhelp » Sun Dec 30, 2007 8:16 pm

    ok i need help on this, the question is.... list three classes of respiratory poisons. Give examples of specific chemicals that fall into these classes.Explain how these poisons provide evidence for chemiosomosis and its dependence upon the sturctural organization of the mitochondrial membrane... i have found a little on the fisrt two questions i just need help on the last
    thanks

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    MrMistery
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    Re: Repiratory poisons

    Post by MrMistery » Sun Dec 30, 2007 9:23 pm

    ok, so there are 3 that come to mind right now:
    uncouplers(such as dinitroferol): these chemicals act as proton channels in the inner mitochondrial membrane, causing the collapse of the proton gradient and therefore making ATP synthesis impossible
    those that interfere with the electron transport chain(such as cianide): these chemicals block the ETC, making pumping of protons impossible
    inhibitors of the F0F1 ATP Synthase itself(such as oligomicine, if i remember correctly): these chemicals block the ATP synthase, making the proton gradient impossible to use.
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    victor
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    Post by victor » Fri Jan 25, 2008 5:11 am

    I think amytal is also listed as a respiratory poison because it's an irreversible inhibitor for NADH dehydrogenase (complex I).
    Rotenone (if I'm not mistaken) is also works like oligomicine. It blocks the FoF1 ATP synthase, so even though there's a PMF, the FoF1 complex would not synthesize any ATPs.
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    Post by MrMistery » Fri Jan 25, 2008 6:34 am

    i just found out that the "o" in FoF1 actually comes from "oligomicine". I knew Fo binds oligomicine, but never made this connection

    well I only gave examples, there are many many more. for example this amytal(which is new for me) inhibits the ETC. This rotenone is a specific inhibitor of the ATP synthase, just like oligomicine.

    There might be others that inhibit respiration on other levels, but none come to mind right now...
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    Borisfen
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    Re: Repiratory poisons

    Post by Borisfen » Thu May 01, 2008 9:26 am

    Unlike oligomycin, rotenone is not ATP synthase inhibitor, it is a specific inhibitor of mitochondrial NADH_dehydrogenase (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NADH_dehydrogenase).

    Take a look at http://www.atpsynthase.info for more information on ATP synthase.

    Regards,

    Boris.

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