Pulse chase plot --cant understand how to decipher these???

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ahjse19
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Pulse chase plot --cant understand how to decipher these???

Post by ahjse19 » Fri Nov 16, 2007 2:50 am

Can sum1 pls help with these graphs. I understand these plots when its just 2 compounds, but what is happening with 4, and what steps do you take when looking at the graph to decipher what is happening at the mplecular level? thanks for any help!

example..
//courses.washington.edu/bioc440/lectures/2007lectures/Pulse_chase_xtra.pdf

ahjse19
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Post by ahjse19 » Fri Nov 16, 2007 2:51 am

FYI, put "http:" in front of link --it wouldne let me post link cuz noobie

blcr11
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Post by blcr11 » Fri Nov 16, 2007 12:39 pm

The idea of the pulse-chase experiment is to allow you to follow incorporated label over time to see where it goes. Most often they are used to determine half-lives and turnover times. I’m unsure of the design of the experiments shown in your link. I am assuming that the pulse-labeling occurs only for compound A. The two experiments show two different sets of precursor-product relationships. The experiment on the left is completely sequential: A goes to B, B goes to C, C goes to D. See how the fall off in A goes through the peak level of B, and the same goes for B’s fall-off through the peak of C, etc, but A does not pass through the peak of C or D. That passing-through-the-peak is classical precursor-product kinetics. I’m less certain of the experiment on the right. I believe it shows three independent reactions in which compound A is converted into three different compounds, B, C, or D. Assuming that the pulse-labeling is in A only, the fall-off in A passes through the peaks of all three of the other compounds, suggesting a precursor product relationship between them. That implies three parallel reactions in which A goes to B, A goes to C, and A goes to D, with the first reaction being fastest and the last reaction the slowest.

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