Cell Glucose uptake !!

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Ciwan
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Cell Glucose uptake !!

Post by Ciwan » Sun Oct 21, 2007 10:41 am

Hi guys

I was just wondering. If we had some cells and we placed them in an isotonic solution containing glucose. Would the cells take up any glucose for respiration use or would the cells starve as there are no insulin molecules in the solution.

Thanks :)

lara
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Post by lara » Sun Oct 21, 2007 1:40 pm

can't the transport happen through facilitated diffusion?

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Dustfinger
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Post by Dustfinger » Mon Oct 22, 2007 1:38 pm

Isn't insulin just used in multicellular systems ? :confused: I think that the cells would be able to take up glucose and wouldn't starve.
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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Mon Oct 22, 2007 8:29 pm

Depend on the cell. For example, if it is a plant cell or a bacterial cell it obviously does not need insuline
If it is a human cell, it depends on what kind of cell it is and what kind of glucose transporters it expresses. This might be a little advanced for you, but things go like this:
Human cells express 4 main kind of glucose permeases: GLUT1, GLUT2, GLUT3 and GLUT4.
GLUT1 accounts for the basal tranport of glucose in all human cells. So no your cell will not starv.
Present on muscle cells and fat cells(in addition to GLUT1) is GLUT4. The number of GLUT4 receptors is insulin-dependent, which make sure these cells are able to take up extra glucose.

Plus, if your cell is an intestinal cell it might have a glucose/Na symporter on its surface. Thus its ability to take up glucose obove the rate of GLUT1 depends on the Na concentration on the outside.

I'm afraid biochemistry is a little more complicated than you appear to think ;) But its fun
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter

Ciwan
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Thanks

Post by Ciwan » Wed Nov 07, 2007 1:17 am

Cool thanks Mr Mistery, that was a nice, clear explaination

Much Appreciated. :D

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