monera kingdom

Discussion of all aspects of cellular structure, physiology and communication.

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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Tue Jun 14, 2005 7:40 pm

Maybe until they decide we will get our PhD's and decide for them :D

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Post by b_d_41501 » Tue Jun 14, 2005 10:47 pm

My personal opinion is that they are not alive. They just carry out a pre-programmed purpose. But remember, that's just my opinion so don't crucify me. lol j/k :D
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Post by victor » Thu Jun 16, 2005 1:41 pm

I agree that virii is living things...um, I've to think for some reasons first.. :roll:
Last edited by victor on Sun Jun 19, 2005 12:47 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Post by victor » Sun Jun 19, 2005 11:48 am

Hey I've thought of some reasons about virii is classified into living or non-living when I was in the toilet this morning.. :lol:
Let's start from this, we know that every living thigs have a DNA or RNA as a blueprint for their next generation. Then we may conclude for the new statement of living organisms are thing that contains nucleic acid (DNA or RNA). This means I conclude that virii can be classified into living organism.

I can think like that because I think that the theory of the living organism that states cell is the smallest structure of life isn't proper anymore. They said it like that because they still don't have any SEM or TEM.
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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Sun Jun 19, 2005 7:44 pm

This has been havily debated on the forum. Use the search function.
PS: What is SEM and TEM?

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Post by Poison » Sun Jun 19, 2005 9:46 pm

There are a lot of reasons why virii can't be alive. Like Andrew said, I advise you to have a search in the forum.
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SEM: Scannig Electron Microscope
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The three domains of life

Post by Wood Thrush » Tue Jun 21, 2005 3:41 am

The concept of diving life into five kingdoms is outdated and no longer biologically useful. Instead, biologists recognize three "domains" of life: Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukaryota. As discussed earlier, viruses are not organisms in the strong sense that archaens, bacteria, and eukaryotes are, and because of this, and the fact that their evoltionary ancestry is unknown, they are simply not included in most classification schemes.

Bacteria is a diverse group of tiny microorganisms with no internal membranes, and their DNA consists of single huge loop anchored to the inner cell surface, as well as smaller loops of DNA called plasmids. They usually have a chemical called peptidoglycan in their cell walls (though there is a group which lacks cell walls altogether). Bacteria get a bad rap for the diseases some types cause, but most are harmless, and many, such as nitrate-producing Rhizobium that live in intimate association with plant roots, are essential parts of natural cycles.

Archaea is the most-recently recognized group, and much of their characteristics are still being discovered by biologists. Archaeans, like bacteria, are microorganisms with no internal membranes, have looped DNA with plastids, and share some aspects of metabolism with bacteria too. But chemically, archeans are very distict from bacteria. For example, the cell membrane is much different from bacteria: the glycerol in their lipids is a mirror image of the kind in bacteria, is linked by ether bonds (ester in bacteria) to branched isoprene chains (unbranched fatty acids in bacteria). Archaea are even more similar to eukaryotes than to bacteria in some respects, such as the details of their genetic transcription and translation! While archaeans thrive in some of the harshest environments on earth, such as super-heated ocean vents and hypersaline water, they aren't exclusively extremists. Some new research is showing they are abundant in ocean plankton.

Finally, Eukaryota is most easily defined as living things whose cells contain "organelles" - membrane-bound "compartments" that specialize in certain metabolic tasks.

Why is the five-kingdoms view deprecated? Ideally, we would like our classification system to reflect the ancestry of species; that is, species that are classified together should be related to each other more closely than to species in other groups. The five kingdoms scheme does not do this. In fact the five-kingdom system groups bacteria and archaea together, even though they are fundamentally very different types of organisms, and probably diverged from each other early on in the history of life. Also, the kingdom called "Protista" is not a sensible entity. Some protists are more closely related to fungi than they are to other protists, some more closely related to plants than other protists, you get the idea. In fact that old group "Protista" contains much, much more diversity than the other eukaryotic kingdoms! If you looked from an evolutionary point of veiw, animals, plants, and fungi are all just specific, multi-cellular "protist" lineages. While modern biologists still use the term "protist", it is a descriptive term, not a classification -- it is used to refer to unicellular eukaryotes as a group.

I am worried that your "advanced" class teaches you outdated science. Then again, your teacher is probably not a biologist, so what should I expect...

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Post by mith » Tue Jun 21, 2005 4:11 am

Yup, teachers are usually not the best in their field(the high school teacher at least).
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Post by victor » Tue Jun 21, 2005 12:18 pm

Hey thanks for the new information..you help me a lot about defining those old kingdoms..I should talk this with my bio teacher about this news..hope she will understand about it. (she is stubborn you know :lol: )
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Post by MrMistery » Tue Jun 21, 2005 5:43 pm

I think your teacher probably knows about this. When we did biosistematics last year i asked my teacher this question and she said: "I hate to teach what is in that book, even if it is updated"
A sad thing....

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victor
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Post by victor » Wed Jun 22, 2005 6:24 am

Even though My teacher teach the newest thing that comes out from the biology..she can't change anything in the government biology curicullum..so..no effect..sad isn't it? :wink:
Q: Why are chemists great for solving problems?
A: They have all the solutions.

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Post by MrMistery » Wed Jun 22, 2005 5:44 pm

Yup, we had a case here in romania, when a biology teacher got his salary cut for teaching the new plant classification instead of the old one...

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