prokaryotic apoptosis

About microscopic forms of life, including Bacteria, Archea, protozoans, algae and fungi. Topics relating to viruses, viroids and prions also belong here.

Moderators: honeev, Leonid, amiradm, BioTeam

Post Reply
benny
Garter
Garter
Posts: 33
Joined: Tue Oct 04, 2005 2:03 pm
Location: adelaide, south australia

prokaryotic apoptosis

Post by benny » Mon Oct 08, 2007 2:12 am

I guess it happens, but does anyone have any solid info on this? I would like to do it as an honours project next year. apoptosis must have existed since the inception of multicellular life, as biofilms would need the same level of control over cells that are out of control or not needed. What about Archea? They always seem to get left out of many discussions, but if they are (possibly) holdovers from life's beginnings, then it would be interesting to see in what context they would use apoptosis, or the suite of genes which express it. I would be grateful for any information anyone would have.
"We have to ask ourselves the question: is our children learning?"

G.W. Bush, boob.

Darby
Viper
Viper
Posts: 1278
Joined: Thu Mar 02, 2006 5:29 pm
Location: New York, USA

Post by Darby » Sat Oct 20, 2007 2:53 am

True colonialism is a controversial feature for bacteria, so you would be explaining independent cellular suicide. And bacterial altruism.

benny
Garter
Garter
Posts: 33
Joined: Tue Oct 04, 2005 2:03 pm
Location: adelaide, south australia

Post by benny » Sat Oct 20, 2007 6:00 am

yes? certain yeasts undergo programmed cell death, and they are unicellular. bacterial altruism and suicide make it sound like a conscious decision made by the bacteria. it can be something analogous to quorum sensing, where certain signals and responses are put in place by something as simple as cell density.
colonialism in bacteria makes sense. most exist in biofilms- not in a planktonic state, and it makes perfect sense to me that bacteria could have been the first multicellular life, by forming these aggregates. the genes for multicellularity are relatively few, and some bacteria already exhibit a primitive "tissue like" multicellularity, i.e. myxobacteria, which form differentiated fruiting bodies.
the attached article gives evidence for a fairly rapid transition from unicellular to multicellular life
"We have to ask ourselves the question: is our children learning?"

G.W. Bush, boob.

benny
Garter
Garter
Posts: 33
Joined: Tue Oct 04, 2005 2:03 pm
Location: adelaide, south australia

Post by benny » Sat Oct 20, 2007 6:04 am

so much for attachments.
Wood et al, 2002, The genome sequence of
Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Nature, vol 415, 21 february :oops:
"We have to ask ourselves the question: is our children learning?"

G.W. Bush, boob.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests