Amino acid sequence

Genetics as it applies to evolution, molecular biology, and medical aspects.

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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Tue Oct 30, 2007 12:06 pm

Jessy Springfield wrote:yes, but by manipulation of specific regions?


Ever heard of site-specific induced mutagenesis? It's kind of advanced stuff, but you asked and i will answer. There are several ways to do this, but i'm just gonna explain to you the one I understand is mostly used.
Know what PCR is? If you design your primers so that they will not be 100% the complementaries of those on your DNA molecule but differ in 2-3 bases, they will still align. by designing the primers specifically to place them over the region that you wanna change, you will mutate the DNA exactly at the site you want changed. Then you cut it up with an endonuclease and you insert it into your organism. Easy as 1-2-3. Actually not. Very hard :lol:
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Post by Jessy Springfield » Tue Oct 30, 2007 7:23 pm

MrMistery wrote:
Jessy Springfield wrote:yes, but by manipulation of specific regions?


Ever heard of site-specific induced mutagenesis? It's kind of advanced stuff, but you asked and i will answer. There are several ways to do this, but i'm just gonna explain to you the one I understand is mostly used.
Know what PCR is? If you design your primers so that they will not be 100% the complementaries of those on your DNA molecule but differ in 2-3 bases, they will still align. by designing the primers specifically to place them over the region that you wanna change, you will mutate the DNA exactly at the site you want changed. Then you cut it up with an endonuclease and you insert it into your organism. Easy as 1-2-3. Actually not. Very hard :lol:

Thanks! By any chance do you have any links too information about this? Or information on where too find resources.

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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Tue Oct 30, 2007 7:29 pm

"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter

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Post by Jessy Springfield » Tue Oct 30, 2007 10:24 pm

MrMistery wrote:ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/bv.fcgi?rid=hmg.section.611
From Human Molecular Cloning 2


Thanks allot! I appreciate your time.

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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Wed Oct 31, 2007 8:21 am

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Post by Cristgonz » Fri Nov 16, 2007 7:07 pm

mith wrote:umm, DNA mutation?

yes, introducing ending codons within the DNA.
for example the UGA one. Thus the transcription will be truncated at the specific place and the other aminoacids wont be expressed.

:shock:
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