How to distinguish one bond from another

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evointrigued
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How to distinguish one bond from another

Post by evointrigued » Tue Sep 25, 2007 1:04 am

How can I tell that a Carbon atom and Hydrogen atom will bond to become non-polar? I know they do, but I have no clue how I could know that.

Is there some pattern I can follow to tell what atoms form polar when bonded and which form non-polar? I understand the basic Bohr model, simple covalent bonding, and octet rule. I do not understand how I can tell which atom will form what type of bond with another certain atom when their valence electrons don't add up to 8.

I'm pretty much taking a high school level course again. I hope I don't bore you.

Thanks for any help.

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mith
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Post by mith » Tue Sep 25, 2007 2:05 am

electronegativity table
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Post by sara sabir » Tue Sep 25, 2007 5:48 am

as there is v low electronegativity difference between C and H so they will not develop poles wen they are attached
that is y they wont have hydrogen bond between them

so the bond between them wud simply be covalent bond
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Post by blcr11 » Tue Sep 25, 2007 2:44 pm

That's basically the idea. The greater the difference in electronegativity between atoms involved in bonding, the more likely it is that the bond between them will be polar to ionic. In the case of CH4, it is easier for the carbon atom to share electrons with the hydgrogens than it is to assume a formal charge of -4, which it would have to do if it were to form complete ionic bonds with the hydrogens. It's not always easy to predict when bonds will be ionic or covalent, and there is a continuum of polarity between completely ionic and completely covalent depending on the atoms involved and the specifics of their electron configurations.

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Post by evointrigued » Tue Sep 25, 2007 7:20 pm

blcr11 wrote:That's basically the idea. The greater the difference in electronegativity between atoms involved in bonding, the more likely it is that the bond between them will be polar to ionic.

Thanks. Can I use electronegativity difference to see whether a covalent bond is polar or non-polar?

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Post by mith » Tue Sep 25, 2007 8:47 pm

a bond, unless between two of the same atoms will always involve unequal sharing of atoms.
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Post by evointrigued » Tue Sep 25, 2007 10:39 pm

- - - Thank you. - - -

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