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Debate and discussion of any biological questions not pertaining to a particular topic.

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xx_aish_xx
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Post by xx_aish_xx » Thu Aug 02, 2007 5:12 pm

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Last edited by xx_aish_xx on Mon Oct 27, 2008 6:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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mith
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Post by mith » Thu Aug 02, 2007 5:46 pm

You can kill a slug by putting salt on it.
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AstusAleator
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Post by AstusAleator » Wed Aug 08, 2007 12:16 am

Could it have anything to do with ion or osmotic gradients?
Yeast most likely will have a much harder time surviving in a saline environment. They will die off more quickly and thus there will be less individual yeasts at any given time, compared to a population that isn't saline....?
I haven't researched this, so just take these comments with a grain of salt (LAUGH)
What did the parasitic Candiru fish say when it finally found a host? - - "Urethra!!"

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victor
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Post by victor » Thu Aug 09, 2007 5:11 am

I think it depends on what salt that you're pouring in. If you pour cyanide salt (i.e. potassium cyanide, KCN) into the yeast, I can say that it really blocks the last electron acceptor in electron transport system :lol:
but be careful, you can also kill yourself with that salt...:lol:
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