What does 'in situ' mean?

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Punita
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What does 'in situ' mean?

Post by Punita » Tue Jul 31, 2007 3:05 pm

Hi, I'm reading a book on cell biology and it keeps using the term 'in situ'. Could I ask, does this always mean 'in the cell itself', or can it also mean 'in an environment that isn't the cell itself but is similiar?'
I'd really appreciate any clarification! Thanks!

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Post by kanzure » Tue Jul 31, 2007 3:58 pm


vikas srivastava
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Post by vikas srivastava » Wed Aug 01, 2007 10:43 am

"insitu" means in laboratory

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Re: What does 'in situ' mean?

Post by Revenged » Wed Aug 01, 2007 11:29 pm

Punita wrote:Hi, I'm reading a book on cell biology and it keeps using the term 'in situ'. Could I ask, does this always mean 'in the cell itself', or can it also mean 'in an environment that isn't the cell itself but is similiar?'
I'd really appreciate any clarification! Thanks!


it depends in what context...

for example, "carcinoma in situ" means a carcinoma (maglignant epithelial cell cancer) that has not spread to surrounding tissues...

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kotoreru
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Post by kotoreru » Thu Aug 02, 2007 9:37 am

In situ, does NOT mean 'in laboratory'. In conservation, we use the term to mean dealing with an organism in its natural environment.

The opposite would be ex situ, where we take an organism from its natural environment for various reasons.

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Post by Punita » Sun Aug 05, 2007 12:52 pm

Thanks everyone, that was really helpful. I think from what I've been reading, Kotoreru's reply seems to fit the context I'm readng in. The book's talking about understanding proteins 'in situ' - so I guess that means in the cell itself? If the proteins had been isolated, they would write 'ex situ' - is that right Kotoreru? Thanks again for your help!

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kotoreru
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Post by kotoreru » Mon Aug 06, 2007 10:33 am

Pretty much, yes Punita. Though personally I've rarely heard the terms used with proteins, but then I'm not a molecular biologist ;)
"What are humans if they don't learn at University? Animals, yes."

^^One of my ex-girlfriends said that. I stress the ex part.

Punita
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Post by Punita » Sat Aug 11, 2007 5:37 pm

Thanks so much for your help Kotoreru! Yeah, I've never come across the term being used with proteins very much either. It may be the context I was reading: it was a book about magnetic resonance force microscopy, which is still pretty new. Thanks a lot for your help Kotoreru, it was much appreciated!

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Post by vishnu kartheek » Sun Aug 19, 2007 5:29 pm

insitu condition is an intermediate conditon between invivo and invitro . invivo means that which takes place inside of an organism,where as invitro means in test tube conditions.I said it as intermediate because total examination will be done exactly in the place where it occurs.

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Post by Punita » Tue Aug 21, 2007 4:04 pm

Thanks for your help Vishnu!

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Post by Narendra Kumar » Thu Aug 23, 2007 3:02 pm

'in-situ' or natural environment. plant takes the nutrient from its original habitat.
'ex-situ' when it taken out from its original habitat to other places (habitat). this habitat can be favourable or not.

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