natural selection question

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cynp662
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natural selection question

Post by cynp662 » Sat Jul 14, 2007 7:31 pm

Can innate knowledge that the species must change to adapt to the envornment cause the female to produce an off spring with a mutated gene that would allow that adaptation? Would that adaptation speed up if a 'connection' between females exist.By the connection I mean , for example women concentrated in one area will synchronize their menstrual cycles.
Last edited by cynp662 on Sat Jul 14, 2007 9:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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kotoreru
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Post by kotoreru » Sat Jul 14, 2007 8:07 pm

I have no idea what you just asked - sorry. I dont even want to hazard a guess as terms like 'innate knowledge' put us on dodgy ground from the word go...
"What are humans if they don't learn at University? Animals, yes."

^^One of my ex-girlfriends said that. I stress the ex part.

cynp662
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Post by cynp662 » Sat Jul 14, 2007 9:29 pm

Is it possible that we have the innate ability to change the genetic code in our offspring to enable them to adapt to the environment?

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kotoreru
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Post by kotoreru » Sat Jul 14, 2007 11:25 pm

Ah I see where you are going with this - can we direct the evolution of our offspring?

Hmm. Well, I daresay there is a piece of work somewhere hinting at this in one form or another, but for all intents and purposes I would have to say no.

Quite simply: the natural variation in our offspring is what is put under selective pressures by the environment. We dont 'manually' manifest these variations, they are just there, all the time - advantageous variants are selected for and thus increase in frequency in the population.

I suppose in a way we do have the innate ability to change the genetic code of our potential offspring (or at least sexually reproductive organisms do). But in direct response to the environment? No.

Am I wrong?

This all boils down to using specific terms correctly and precisely.
"What are humans if they don't learn at University? Animals, yes."

^^One of my ex-girlfriends said that. I stress the ex part.

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Post by Darby » Sun Jul 15, 2007 3:31 am

What's suggested is a kind of neolamarkism - but you don't get what you need, you get what you get, and most times it's not a help.

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mith
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Post by mith » Sun Jul 15, 2007 5:30 am

It works for sci-fi shows well enough
Living one day at a time;
Enjoying one moment at a time;
Accepting hardships as the pathway to peace;
~Niebuhr

cynp662
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Post by cynp662 » Sun Jul 15, 2007 5:10 pm

Thank you, I'll keep that in mind if I ever write a sci-fi show.

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Post by Kevo214 » Sun Aug 05, 2007 4:23 am

.......
Last edited by Kevo214 on Tue Sep 15, 2009 8:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by wbla3335 » Mon Aug 06, 2007 8:42 am

Yes, bad analogy. No further comment.

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AstusAleator
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Post by AstusAleator » Tue Aug 07, 2007 11:55 pm

If this could occur, we would probably see much more rapid speciation, especially with the changes in environments that have taken place all across the globe in the last few hundred years. I'm assuming that you're not just talking about humans, but all animals (at least placental mammals...)

So far as I know there is no mechanism that can pre-select for a desired mutation.

A more reasonable hypothesis might be that if an individual is in a stressful environment, their zygotes are more likely to experience mutations due to increased levels of certain hormones, or the presence of other chemicals (oxidizers etc).

Even so, the results of these mutations would be random, within the capability of the genome.
More likely than not, a system like this would result in many unfit offspring, many more dead offspring, and a very few that might have an equal or slightly higher fitness than their parents. This type of selection strategy (if it exists) would only really be practical in a r-selected species that can pump out bazillions of offspring.
What did the parasitic Candiru fish say when it finally found a host? - - "Urethra!!"

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Re: natural selection question

Post by extinct » Fri Sep 21, 2007 11:39 pm

cynp662 wrote:Can innate knowledge that the species must change to adapt to the envornment cause the female to produce an off spring with a mutated gene that would allow that adaptation?

She might go after the big one that gets all the energy who happens to carry the "big one" gene. I don't know that she will randomly produce a "big one" when reproducing with the little one.



cynp662 wrote:Would that adaptation speed up if a 'connection' between females exist.By the connection I mean , for example women concentrated in one area will synchronize their menstrual cycles.

if they all got with the big one it would happen sooner

signed - the big one

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