Enzyme

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MIA6
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Enzyme

Post by MIA6 » Wed Jun 20, 2007 12:28 am

When i read about enzyme active site and substrate, it was mentioned something about 'enzyme concentration'? But i don't know what that means. DOes it affect enzyme activities?
thanks for help.

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Katy_Bobbles
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Post by Katy_Bobbles » Wed Jun 20, 2007 9:58 am

The concentration (amount) of enzyme will affect enzyme-substrate binding. As enzyme concentration is doubled, the rate at which products are produced (rate of reaction) also doubles. Although this is dependent on a sufficient amount of substrate available. Likewise if substrate concentration is increased, rate of reaction also increases assuming a sufficient amount of enzyme. :)

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khenwood
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Post by khenwood » Thu Jun 28, 2007 6:49 pm

Or in very basic terms, enzyme concentration = how much of the enzyme you have in solution.
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Ewa
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Re: Enzyme

Post by Ewa » Wed Jul 04, 2007 6:36 pm

MIA6 wrote:When i read about enzyme active site and substrate, it was mentioned something about 'enzyme concentration'? But i don't know what that means. DOes it affect enzyme activities?
thanks for help.


enzyme is simply a protein, so it is basically the total concentration of this specific protein you have in your solution

however, different preparations have different activities, even if the protein concentrations are the same

best,
Ewa

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Post by lara » Thu Jul 19, 2007 9:55 am

enzyme conc effects till all the active sites are saturated with the substrates

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Post by vikas srivastava » Tue Jul 31, 2007 6:32 am

as far as enzymatic reactions are concerned ,enzyme concentration reflects the sense of "number of active site",which definitely affect rate of reaction,till its saturation.

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Can enzymes be located in bones? Might be a dum question.

Post by jtmartin » Fri Aug 10, 2007 5:41 am

I'm trying to find out if anyone knows whether enzymes can be found in bones. But specifically fossils. That is, if I were to do a trace for enzymes would I find it in the bones. I'm not a biology student so I don't know if this is a dum question.

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Post by canalon » Fri Aug 10, 2007 8:43 pm

There are enzymes in bones, but when fossilized I do not think that any protein would still be active, if even present.
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Thanks for the help, another question

Post by jtmartin » Tue Aug 14, 2007 4:31 am

Thanks Canalon and vikas for your responses on enzymes in bones. Now that I'm getting a little better understanding, tell me if I'm correct. Enzymes will continue to react as long as there are sufficient amounts of substrates to react with and sufficient amounts of enzymes. For example, if a human body intakes a number of enzymes that react a certain way, it will react until the enzymes are gone or the substrates are gone? If the substrates replenish or the enzymes replenish then the reaction can happen again?

Does someone trace an enzyme by the reaction its creating with a substrate, or do we trace them by their molecular makeup, reaction or no reaction?

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mith
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Post by mith » Tue Aug 14, 2007 10:06 pm

the enzymes usually won't go away, but there will be some sort of feedback mechanism to inactivate them once the correct concentration conditions are created.
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Post by MrMistery » Sun Aug 19, 2007 8:32 pm

the enzymes can go away too. think controlled degradation. or self-digestion by pepsin :)
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Post by dr. dugmore » Tue Aug 21, 2007 3:30 am

khenwood wrote:Or in very basic terms, enzyme concentration = how much of the enzyme you have in solution.


true!
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