beadle and tatums experiments

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bionut720
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beadle and tatums experiments

Post by bionut720 » Sun Apr 22, 2007 12:16 pm

what is the big deal about these guys and their One gen One enzyme hypothesis?

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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Sun Apr 22, 2007 3:36 pm

what do you mean? the one gene - one protein hypothesis, although changed a bit with time, is one of the most important ideas in genetics
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter

bionut720
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Post by bionut720 » Mon Apr 23, 2007 1:58 am

whats so important about it?

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Post by blcr11 » Mon Apr 23, 2007 3:05 am

Prior to Beadle & Tatum there was no direct connection between genetics and biochemistry. One could identify genes by phenotype, but nobody really knew how the genes produced the trait you see in a genetic experiment. And the biochemist could study the properties of an enzyme, but no one really understood where the enzyme came from—beyond the obvious fact that cells must somehow make them. The proof that nucleic acid was responsible for transferring genetic information was still more than ten years into the future. It had been suggested by Garrod that genes might be related to enzymes when he suggested that some inheritable diseases might be caused by the lack of certain enzymes, but until Beadle & Tatum, no one was listening. So it was a big deal for both genetics and biochemistry when they provided convincing evidence that there is a one-to-one correspondence between a phenotypically defined gene and a biochemically defined “enzyme” (now we would say “protein”). If you want to know the details of their experiment, I recommend Gunther Stent’s Molecular Genetics: A Personal Narrative, or go look up the original 1941 paper.

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