Reporter Genes

Genetics as it applies to evolution, molecular biology, and medical aspects.

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Agronomy
Garter
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Joined: Wed Jan 17, 2007 5:04 am

Reporter Genes

Post by Agronomy » Tue Mar 27, 2007 10:39 pm

As you may know, certain species of jellyfish emit a "green glow". This is because jellyfish have a gene that encodes a bioluminescent protein called green fluorescent protein (GFP). When exposed to UV light, the protein emits a green-colored light. Scientists have been able to clone the GFP gene from a sample of jellyfish cells. You also know that the TTG gene in the plant Arabidopsis thaliana is required for the initiation of trichomes. Furthermore, in labs 4 through 9 you successfully isolated and cloned the TTG gene using the DNA extracted from the wild-type strain Columbia. Suppose you believe that you have generated a transgenic Arabidopsis plant which carries the chimeric gene TTG/GFP (see Protocol 10-1 on pages 56-58 for more information). How can you prove that the plant indeed carries the chimeric gene?. Note: Do not describe how to generate transgenic plants or chimeric genes!

I have no idea how to answer this question...would someone be able to help me please?

blcr11
Viper
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Post by blcr11 » Sun Apr 01, 2007 12:11 am

Think fluorescence. What would sections of an Arabidopsis leaf look like under a fluorscence microscope if the plant expressed a chimeric TTG/GFP gene?

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