organelles (both plant and animal)

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royboy
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organelles (both plant and animal)

Post by royboy » Sun Mar 25, 2007 11:10 am

hey there people need help wit my assignment. anyone got any idea on which is the most unimportant organelle in a cell? i mean one that u could get rid off and wouldnt make much of a difference?

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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Sun Mar 25, 2007 9:47 pm

centrioles.
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Post by royboy » Mon Mar 26, 2007 7:29 am

wat exactly does the centriole do???

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Dustfinger
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Post by Dustfinger » Mon Mar 26, 2007 9:55 am

They are relevant in the mitosis.
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Post by rindishy » Wed Apr 04, 2007 12:22 am

centrioles ARE needed

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alcyon
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Post by alcyon » Sat Apr 14, 2007 12:00 pm

but some plants don't really have them though... why do some animal cells need them (if they really need them) and some plants don't?

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kotoreru
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Post by kotoreru » Sat Apr 14, 2007 1:33 pm

You can remove the ribosomes from the rough endoplasmic reticulum and the cell will still function well, if I recall. I could be wrong though. Obviously you still need ribosomes in the cell though.

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Post by alcyon » Sat Apr 14, 2007 3:11 pm

some say that if a protein that will be transported out of the cell in the end is being made, it will first happen on a ribosome not attached to the ER, and then the already thynthesized part of the peptide chain will direct the ribosomes toward the ER; Yet some others has it that some ribosomes are permanantly attached to the ER and only these ribosomes produce protein that will be used outside of the cell...(sorry I forgot the word for 'proteins used outside of the cell' in English, so this get's a bit long)

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Post by Darby » Sat Apr 14, 2007 6:47 pm

It depends upon the cell.

For many body cells that will never divide again, like muscle cells, centrioles would work, but I don't think they persist anyway.

Cells don't tend to have a lot of extraneous parts - most guesses at this would include a certain amount of ignorance about the purpose of some organelles in some cells.

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Post by MrMistery » Mon Apr 16, 2007 11:07 am

the function of centrioles is still unknown. plant cells lack them, and if you distroy them using a microlaser in an animal cell, the cell will still undergo mitosis. mitosis will work even without a centrosome at all, by the formation of what is known as a bipolar spindle.
i am not saying that centrioles have no function. the probably do, considering natural selection. however, it is not known yet.

ribosomes can attach and detach from the ER. protein synthesis always starts on free ribosomes in the cytoplasm. then once a part of the protein is synthetised(the signal sequence) a protein named the signal recognition particle attaches to the protein being made, stopping protein synthesis. then, the ribosome docks on the ER on a special multiprotein particle named a translocon. the process is complex, but the point is that ribosomes on the ER are not different from free ribosomes in the cytoplasm.
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alcyon
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Post by alcyon » Mon Apr 16, 2007 1:56 pm

Oh...so the ribosomes only attach to the ER during protein synthesis?

And, just wondering, where did u get such clear information from? My highschool text book said something really vague about this and when i tried to find out I didn't know where to look. Even some of the Uni texts only gave a fuzzy kind of outline.

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Post by MrMistery » Sat Apr 21, 2007 7:34 pm

well i wrote that from my memory. But if you want to study cell bio i recommend Alberts. It's free on pubmed http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/bv.fc ... OC&depth=2
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter

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