Why Palmitate is a common constituent of cells?

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2Loula
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Why Palmitate is a common constituent of cells?

Post by 2Loula » Tue Mar 13, 2007 12:57 pm

Hey,

I was wondering if anyone could help me with this. I cannot find any definite answers anywhere, though I am still looking, but if anyone has any info on this, it would be great.

Why is the organic compound hexadecane not a common constituent of cells, wheras Palmitate is?

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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Sat Mar 17, 2007 3:36 pm

Palmitate has a carboxyl group that allows it to be slightly soluble in water, and, importantly, allows it to make esters so it can be used as a membrane lipid or converted to tryacylglycerol for storage etc...
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter

siwel
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Re: Why Palmitate is a common constituent of cells?

Post by siwel » Tue Mar 20, 2007 4:42 pm

2Loula wrote:Hey,

I was wondering if anyone could help me with this. I cannot find any definite answers anywhere, though I am still looking, but if anyone has any info on this, it would be great.

Why is the organic compound hexadecane not a common constituent of cells, wheras Palmitate is?


any chance you're at caledonian doing a life science, this problem solving book is murder

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Post by 2Loula » Tue Mar 20, 2007 6:56 pm

Yup, I am....I have spent bloody ages trying to find these questions using textbooks & the net.

Thanks MrMistery, I thought it had something to do with the carboxyl group. Your help is much appreciated.

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Post by Genivive1 » Tue Mar 20, 2007 7:34 pm

2Loula wrote:Yup, I am....I have spent bloody ages trying to find these questions using textbooks & the net.

Thanks MrMistery, I thought it had something to do with the carboxyl group. Your help is much appreciated.


Hey, I am so glad someone else was finding that question a pain!!

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Post by siwel » Tue Mar 20, 2007 10:54 pm

so is that three of us that are studying bio med ( or related degree) at caledonian

2Loula
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Post by 2Loula » Wed Mar 21, 2007 5:16 pm

I'm doing biomed.... and have no idea how to do half the questions in the bloody booklet.

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Post by siwel » Wed Mar 21, 2007 10:54 pm

it looks like im going to have to most of the booklet on my own, no-one else can do it.

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Post by Stewart » Thu Mar 22, 2007 8:34 pm

if anyone from caley wants help with question 6 in the casebook,pm me and i'll send u a link for a gd website, cant post it up here yet for some daft reason

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Post by Stewart » Sat Mar 24, 2007 2:37 pm

hi, i was wondering if anyone could possibly tell me some of the nutritional and health implications of using D and L glucose, apart from the fact that d can be metabolised and l cant, and that l is used in chewing gum to minimise tooth decay. thanks.

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Post by MrMistery » Sat Mar 24, 2007 10:54 pm

l is used in chewing gum cause it is still sweet, but bacteria can't grow on it.
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter

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