What animals are known for their taste and touch?

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Silverbackman
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What animals are known for their taste and touch?

Post by Silverbackman » Mon Mar 12, 2007 6:34 pm

Different animals are known for their unique area in different senses. Dogs for example are good at smelling, and maybe able to even smell in color. Bats have very good hearing and may even be able to hear in color. Humans are known for their sense of sight, and are very able to see in colors than many other animals.

What animals are known for their excellent above average sense of taste? Or touch? Like how a human is with sight, a bat with hearing, and a dog with smell?

And how would these abilities be noticeable? For example, a dog sense of smell is so sensitive and powerful that it can distinguish different chemicals that are almost identical. Bats can hear detail very well in within sound waves. Humans can distinguish different items that are very similar well with their eye's ability to say such a wide variety of light that is in their spectrum.

Taste would probably be similar to smell (both are linked), being able to determine more detail in chemicals through a more sensitive and power tongue. Not sure how touch is amplified. What would touch be able to do at a greater level. Sight is for sensing light, sound for waves, smell and taste for chemicals, but what about touch? Perhaps greater details of pressure?

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Post by WolverSyr » Tue Mar 13, 2007 2:26 am

I'm not sure I understand the concept of smelling or hearing in colors, but I'm not much of an abstract thinker. :wink:

Many, many animals see in color besides humans. Many animals see colors beyond what we see - bees for example.

I suppose if you're looking for animals that use touch to interpret their world, take a look at some very common ones - housecats, mice and cockroaches all use touch. Your cat's whiskers and the stiffer hairs along it's body are great at feeling around a dark room, and even sensing a change in air currents. Roaches, and many other insects have hairs along their bodys that help them "feel out" their surroundings.

As for taste, how about things like rattlesnakes & monitor lizards that have a jacobson's organ.

Lastly, if I recall, many arthropods are able to pick up molecules from the air on their antennae and transfer them to their mouth.

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Post by Dr.Stein » Tue Mar 13, 2007 3:36 am

Rats and mice are known some of the best lab animals regarding to stress reaction. They will easily get stressful if we touch them. They will urinate, defecate, increase blood pressure, heart beat, adrenaline to face the stressor.

About animal for the best taste, I am not sure...
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Post by nugget » Sat Mar 17, 2007 8:29 am

I dont know which animals pur se, but the bitter tasting ability which has been identified recently as PDKL1 i THINK from memory as very important, because as u may or may not know bitter is assosciated with acid. Its therefore important they can taste this. The same protein channels are found within spino cerebral fluid. this tells us the function is for PH regulation.
i would imagine the sensory organs being more densely packed with receptors for amplification...
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Post by CoffeaRobusta » Sun Apr 08, 2007 5:08 am

I think it's hard to say that any animals has the best sense of taste. You need to ask who is the best at discriminating sweet, bitter, etc. I imagine the animals that have hte best discriminator abilites for sweetness would be specialized eaters like frugivores.

Touch is related to pressure, but also consider we also sense something relative temperature, and pain. Consider too that the perception of pressure can give rise to sensations of shape, texture, softness, or vibration. Pressure sensors (for example, otoliths in fish) can provide information on movement, and orientation with respect to gracity. I would say that animals that have great senses of touch don't rely on sight, or hearing for hunting. Certain cave dwellers maybe, or how about the water shrew that hunts underwater with its whiskers?

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Post by kotoreru » Thu Apr 12, 2007 9:31 pm

I seem to remember a fascinating video about a water vole/shrew (or similar) that uses its paws to feel underwater rocks for likelihood of harbouring insects.

I believe this was made obvious by direct observation and also an obvious enlargement of the part of the brain associated with touch (a bit out of my depth here)...

Does anyone know what I'm talking about?
Hope that helps anyway.
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Post by CoffeaRobusta » Fri Apr 13, 2007 6:31 am

I know that the eurasian water shrew has venomous saliva. Maybe that video was in Life of Mammals with David Attenburough?
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kotoreru
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Post by kotoreru » Fri Apr 13, 2007 10:13 am

Ah actually yes it could have Life of Mammals...cant remember about it being venomous though. They did an excellent 'reconstruction' of what it may be like to 'see' with touch.
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Post by emus are coming » Mon Apr 16, 2007 9:10 am

dont the majority of lobsters and crayfish use there long antenae to feel wats around them same with lots of insects which use the feelers/antenae for the same reason.
i read somewhere that cats have the most sophisticated sense of touch, cause they have pressure points all over there bodies that keep them awear of wats around them....i think that was on the animal planet website.

oh i finally thought of one for taste...butterflys they walk on the plants and taste throu their feet they have to get points for that.
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Post by orbit » Tue May 08, 2007 1:57 am

Sharks are amazing sensory beings. If you include distant touch as touch then they have a great sense of touch. There is some argument over whether animals in the water can smell or if it more of a taste. These senses are very much considered to be related in land animals, and in water there is probably more debate over what is smell and taste. Whatever you call it, sharks are also high developed in this regard.
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Post by kotoreru » Tue May 08, 2007 12:40 pm

Smell is basically the perception of chemicals from a distant source...taste is the perception of chemicals from direct contact with the source.

But yeh I see what you mean about these defintions becoming blurred in the water.
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