How Bacteria and Viruses work.. in the Nervous system

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twiiistCH
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How Bacteria and Viruses work.. in the Nervous system

Post by twiiistCH » Wed Mar 11, 2009 5:23 pm

Hi I just got a question regarding nervous infections

I just wonder how to you get infected by bacteria and viruses in the nervous system.

Do the bacteria and viruses pass though the intestinal or respiratory tract to gain access to the nerves? I guess so but...how come they get attracted to it?

Thanks for theses common gloups..!

best regards

alex

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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Fri Mar 13, 2009 4:21 pm

they don't get attracted to it. they flow through the blood and when they reach the brain they stick there. Bacteria may present some chemotaxis, but only once they reach the brain (the brain is big if you're a bacterium, and most bacteria have some favorite spots)

On that note, this month's issue of Nature shows that prions move from one cell to another through the newly discovered tunnelling nanotubes. if anyone is interested in that kinda stuff, you might wanna look into that.
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter

plasmodesmata11
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Post by plasmodesmata11 » Sat Mar 14, 2009 2:59 am

Wicked cool. Again, surprising it was not found out earlier.
http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg2 ... tml?page=1

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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Sat Mar 14, 2009 4:21 am

plasmodesmata11, you should note that cell biology is very far from being understood, even in the big picture. There are many many questions that people simply have no idea about. For example, what happens to the Golgi apparatus at mitosis? Or how can a cell direct components to the daughter cells asymmetrically in mitosis? And aside from questions regarding stuff that happens and we don't understand, there are things which don't even know about, like tunnelling nanotubes.
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter

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MichaelXY
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Post by MichaelXY » Sun Mar 15, 2009 7:38 am

Damn Mistery, your like a walking textbook. Can I have a job in your company someday? :)

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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Sun Mar 15, 2009 9:07 pm

I don't intend on ever starting a company, but if I end up doing doing that I'll let you know.
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter

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MrMistery
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Post by MrMistery » Sun Mar 15, 2009 11:01 pm

by the way, on the topic of unanswered questions in cell biology. in one of my classes I recently came across this paper http://jcb.rupress.org/cgi/content/abstract/183/5/949 as we are studying cell migration. I consider this paper to be very important for the point I was trying to make above: it basically tells us that we still have a whole bunch to learn about the cytoskeleton and how microtubule position is regulated, about vesicle targeting with clathrin coat proteins and about the transport pathways within the endomembrane system.
"As a biologist, I firmly believe that when you're dead, you're dead. Except for what you live behind in history. That's the only afterlife" - J. Craig Venter

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