Evolution

Genetics as it applies to evolution, molecular biology, and medical aspects.

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RIC10
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Evolution

Post by RIC10 » Thu Sep 27, 2007 11:02 pm

Hi everybody.

I'm new here, and I'm only a few weeks into a basic Anthropology course and I'm already very confused. I can't believe this is an introductory class. I've got a really bad feeling about it.

Anyway, can someone help me with this...

Suppose that one time there was a single population. A river was created during the last rainy season, creating two new populations. Population A has 15 individuals, 5 with yellow eyes, 5 with orange eyes, and 5 with green eyes. Population B has the same population size and allele frequencies. On the side of the river that A inhabits, there is a nocturnal predator. It can see light reflecting off individuals with yellow eyes, but not orange or green eyes. It can only detect and catch individuals with yellow eyes. On the side of the river B inhabits there are no predators.

With the selective agents changing changing the allele frequencies, does this increase, decrease or maintain the genetic diversity within population A?

Does this increase, decrease, or maintain the genetic diversity between the two populations?

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kotoreru
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Post by kotoreru » Thu Sep 27, 2007 11:31 pm

The selective force is removing yellow eyes from population A, so it is decreasing the diversity in it.

There is no mention of any breeding between the two populations so the last part simply cannot be answered.

Best of luck with the course.
"What are humans if they don't learn at University? Animals, yes."

^^One of my ex-girlfriends said that. I stress the ex part.

RIC10
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Post by RIC10 » Thu Sep 27, 2007 11:38 pm

Thank you very much for your help!

The second part of the question is actually worded as, "Does this increase (they are less similar), decrease (they are more similar), or maintain (there is no change) the genetic diversity between the two populations?" I didn't word it that way in my original post, so I don't know if that makes a difference.

There are several more questions that I must answer, but since I'm new here I don't know how much help you folk here are willing to give with homework.

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Post by RIC10 » Thu Sep 27, 2007 11:42 pm

Create the original two populations of 5 yellow, 5 orange and 5 green eyed critters. In this scenario, there are predators that can locate individuals with yellow eyes on both sides of the river.

Does this increase, decrease or maintain the genetic diversity within population A?

Does this increase, decrease, or maintain the genetic diversity between populations?

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kotoreru
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Post by kotoreru » Fri Sep 28, 2007 10:30 am

Well yes we are certainly adverse to doing people's homework for them, but keep it reasonable and there should be no problem.

The second question you posted is exactly the same as the first except both populations are affected - can you see that?

The wording of that question about diversity between the populations that have no gene flow is terrible! Given the parts in brackets (or parentheses lol) then of course it increases the diversity as the two populations become less similar...yeh?
"What are humans if they don't learn at University? Animals, yes."

^^One of my ex-girlfriends said that. I stress the ex part.

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