Distinguishing Gametes & Genotypes

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engineeredorganism
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Distinguishing Gametes & Genotypes

Post by engineeredorganism » Mon Apr 09, 2007 12:34 am

This is a really newbie question but basically whats the relation with gametes and genotypes. 1. D 2. TT 3. Gg 4. tg 6. EeCC 7. eGmJ
Which ones are which?

RastaTings
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Post by RastaTings » Mon Apr 09, 2007 1:23 am

Gametes are haploid meiotic products that will impact what genotype the zygote (fertilized egg) will have. Gametes therfore contribute half of the genotype, the total genotype will me made up of the genetic material contributed by 2 gametes. So a genotype will have 2 copies of a gene, while a gamete will only have one....hopefully now you can answer your questions as to which is a gamete and which is a genotype (this answer was given assuming your question is dealing with diploid, eukaryotic organisms)

blcr11
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Post by blcr11 » Tue Apr 10, 2007 5:25 pm

I wonder if the real question was which of the items listed represents a possible genotype designation for a gamete. Doesn't make much sense to me to try and distinguish a "gamete" from a "genotype." #s 2,3, and 6 (no 5?) show two alleles for each gene and so can't be the genotypes for a gamete. The others only show 1 allele per gene and are (or at least could be) genotypes for gametes. That presumes the usual capital letter for dominant, small letter for recessive allele designation.

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Post by blcr11 » Tue Apr 10, 2007 7:26 pm

Or is it not proper to talk about the genotype of a gamete? Sorry, I'm a chemist/structual biologist (as in crystallographer), not much of a geneticist. My daughter just finished studying mitosis and is beginning meiosis and I probably don't know much more about the proper genetic terms than what they're teaching 7th grade honors students these days. My cell biology classes are but a distant memory to me, now.

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CoffeaRobusta
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Post by CoffeaRobusta » Wed Apr 11, 2007 6:30 am

You're right blcr11.....genotype generally refer to the entire genetic makeup of the indiviual. But I understand what you mean by genotype of a gamete. :) Yields the same answer in any case.
Scientists are a friendly, atheistic, hard-working, beer-drinking lot whose minds are preoccupied with sex, chess and baseball when they are not preoccupied with science.
-Yann Martel, Life of Pi

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