Search found 778 matches

by biohazard
Mon Feb 20, 2012 9:22 am
Forum: Microbiology
Topic: HELP! Why do I keep getting a mixed culture in my gramstain?
Replies: 11
Views: 17755

Like Canalon said, getting pure cultures is probably the key factor. Repeat the streaking several times if needed and be careful to pick isolated colonies and use sterile instruments. You should get well-isolated colonies with one or two well-streaked plates (take care to not take too much of the sa...
by biohazard
Mon Feb 06, 2012 7:23 am
Forum: Cell Biology
Topic: hybridomas
Replies: 1
Views: 2316

I cannot say for sure without seeing your white dots, but many suspension cells grow in "clumps", meaning that a cell has started to divide there and has generated a lot of daughter cells at that location. Another possibility is that the cells simply stick into one another, causing visible...
by biohazard
Fri Feb 03, 2012 2:09 pm
Forum: Cell Biology
Topic: Learning tissue culture, specifically moDC generation
Replies: 2
Views: 3870

Monocyte-derived DCs should be easy enough to culture even with limited experience. Basically you need cell-culture plates that allow monocytes to stick onto its surface (they attach readily to most "hard" plastic surfaces), serum-free culture medium (such as AIM-V), growth factors (poly-I...
by biohazard
Thu Jan 26, 2012 11:35 am
Forum: Physiology
Topic: Thermal insulation by adipose tissue
Replies: 6
Views: 18776

Re:

Biohazard, thanks a lot for the comprehensive explanation. Also, sweating is a physiological response found only in humans right? Because I have never come across another mammals that sweats. I am not certain to what extent animals sweat, but I know that many mammals are capable of sweating to some...
by biohazard
Thu Jan 26, 2012 10:29 am
Forum: Physiology
Topic: Thermal insulation by adipose tissue
Replies: 6
Views: 18776

The adipose tissue contains less water and blood vessels than most other tissues in the body. Thus, it conducts heat less efficiently, helping it to be retained in the core organs. Also, low blood flow amounts to lesser heat loss. In order to reverse this in hot environments, the surface blood vesse...
by biohazard
Mon Jan 09, 2012 6:55 am
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: Homeostasis in Humans
Replies: 1
Views: 3869

The body temperature is controlled by the anterior hypothalamus (the preoptic area). It directly senses the temperature, as well as evaluates the thermoreceptor signals coming from the skin and other parts of the body (e.g. mucous membranes). Based on these signals it promotes either heat retention ...
by biohazard
Mon Dec 19, 2011 7:29 am
Forum: Molecular Biology
Topic: ELISA - Serum sample
Replies: 2
Views: 1794

PBS should be ok in most cases.
by biohazard
Fri Dec 09, 2011 7:57 am
Forum: Physiology
Topic: Muscles anatomy question ?
Replies: 3
Views: 6704

And you sent this to the botany discussion...? :D No, the antagonist muscle does not generate equal force - if it did, muscles could not cause movement. Thus, you also need to train both the agonist and antagonist separately. The antagonist generates some force, though - the amount depending on the ...
by biohazard
Thu Nov 17, 2011 8:34 am
Forum: Cell Biology
Topic: sizes of parts of a cell
Replies: 8
Views: 7601

Re:

JackBean wrote:I guess so. Just that in all the animations are the ribosomes so small :lol:


Yeah, I guess they can be considered rather tiny even on a cellular scale, since most cells can contain thousands of them or more.
by biohazard
Thu Nov 17, 2011 8:14 am
Forum: Cell Biology
Topic: sizes of parts of a cell
Replies: 8
Views: 7601

Re:

I know that ribosomes are composed of few RNAs and several proteins, but the hemoglobin gene, to my knowledge, is quite huge (I think it contains several very long introns, doesn't it?). Cannot it be bigger than ribosome? Well, for starters there are several "haemoglobin genes" (e.g. gene...
by biohazard
Wed Nov 16, 2011 7:47 am
Forum: Molecular Biology
Topic: Can I freeze RNA that is atteched to a column?
Replies: 7
Views: 5367

Cool, thanks for letting us know :)

Btw, did you freeze them with some cryopreservant / RNAse inhibitor, or just as they were?
by biohazard
Wed Nov 16, 2011 7:45 am
Forum: Cell Biology
Topic: sizes of parts of a cell
Replies: 8
Views: 7601

Re:

but how do you know ribosome>chromosome? Ribosomes are rather tiny, only something like max 30 nm in diameter in eukaryotes and bit smaller in prokaryotes. Chromosomes are considerably larger - so large that when condensed you can see eukaryote chromosomes easily with a light microscope. And to see...