Search found 7 matches

by uga hort nerd
Wed Nov 23, 2005 4:05 am
Forum: Botany Discussion
Topic: Astrophytum seeds
Replies: 0
Views: 1798

Astrophytum seeds

Hello everyone, I was wondering if anyone knew how long it takes for astrophytums to reach maturity and flower. Also, if anyone knows of a reliable source for viable seed, I am interested in doing a term paper on germination rates under different treatments. (University of Georgia). Seeds seem prett...
by uga hort nerd
Wed Nov 23, 2005 4:00 am
Forum: Cell Biology
Topic: Question!!
Replies: 3
Views: 2975

All plants (C3, C4, and CAM) use the Calvin Cycle, just at different times of day.

CAM plants affix CO2 at night.

The rest you can find on a google seach
by uga hort nerd
Wed Nov 23, 2005 3:56 am
Forum: Botany Discussion
Topic: <~ö All about cacti ö~>
Replies: 24
Views: 14919

Cacti don't release CO2 _at_ night. They use crassulacean acid metabolism (forgive my spelling). They, along with other succulents and bromeliads etc. open their stomata at night to reduce water loss and take in CO2 at night. They release O2 _at_ night which is a good thing.
by uga hort nerd
Wed Nov 23, 2005 3:42 am
Forum: Botany Discussion
Topic: Please help identify flower
Replies: 10
Views: 7932

It is a type of bulbous plant from africa called ryncis or rincus or something like that. Leaves will appear in spring and only blooms in fall. It had me stumped walking around athens, ga. for about a week.
by uga hort nerd
Wed Nov 23, 2005 3:35 am
Forum: Botany Discussion
Topic: More unknown plants
Replies: 3
Views: 3718

I agree, the first one looks like celosia (aka cocks' comb)

The second one is a type of salvia, but the picture is pretty dark. I would guess Salvia guaranitica
by uga hort nerd
Wed Nov 23, 2005 3:31 am
Forum: Botany Discussion
Topic: Species determination
Replies: 6
Views: 4717

The second one appears to be a plumeria
by uga hort nerd
Wed Nov 23, 2005 3:28 am
Forum: Botany Discussion
Topic: Grafting? and other plant realted questions
Replies: 9
Views: 13929

Howdy, Another way to solve the rabbit problem is a process called in-arching. You basically plant small rooted cuttings or seedlings around the perimeter of the tree and graft them to the host tree. The cut on the host should look like a "T". As mentioned previosly, bridge grafting is another solut...