Search found 9 matches

by DougB
Wed May 30, 2012 4:24 pm
Forum: Genetics
Topic: sample(material) needed from a person to genome sequence?
Replies: 6
Views: 5624

We find buccal (cheek) swabs to be the easiest to work with for genomic DNA. Only hair root has genomic DNA. Blood and reproductive fluid tends to be more difficult to obtain. You can get a decent yield of quality DNA from the buccal swabs.
by DougB
Tue May 29, 2012 5:18 pm
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: Bones found under house
Replies: 3
Views: 3905

Since you are in Australia, have you considered kangaroo or wallaby?

DougB
by DougB
Wed May 16, 2012 3:24 pm
Forum: Genetics
Topic: Chromosomes And Heredity
Replies: 4
Views: 12103

Re: Chromosomes And Heredity

I would agree that the answer is A-Mitosis. Basically, mitosis is a process where the cell genetic content (2N or diploid) is duplicated. Watson and Crick described the process as semi-conservative. New copies of each chromosome actually contain one strand from the original cell and one new strand, ...
by DougB
Thu May 03, 2012 2:48 pm
Forum: Molecular Biology
Topic: Molecular gene (genome) concept scientifically untenable
Replies: 12
Views: 59562

I think there is some history to development of genetics as a study in your post. Perhaps one thing we can take from this is that genetics as a field is constantly evolving. One new area that seeks to explain gene expression is epigenetics, how something external influences gene expression. One exam...
by DougB
Tue Apr 24, 2012 2:44 pm
Forum: Genetics
Topic: genetic sequencing survey
Replies: 1
Views: 1635

Hi Sophie, Posting here might be a good start. Hopefully other people like myself will see your post and contribute to the survey. You might let everyone know that the survey is short and would only take a couple of minutes. I will pass the link to others as well. You could try www.abrf.org. They ha...
by DougB
Mon Apr 23, 2012 6:25 pm
Forum: Genetics
Topic: Sequencing Primers
Replies: 4
Views: 5858

Thanks Jackbean, I guess that would be a good question. There are several possible methods for identifying the bases of an unknown region. One method is to synthesize a single stranded piece of DNA with a radioactive or fluorescent label as a probe. In ligation, the probe would only anneal to compli...
by DougB
Wed Apr 18, 2012 2:28 pm
Forum: Molecular Biology
Topic: DO NOT UNDERSTAND PRIMER DESIGN
Replies: 4
Views: 5095

Sorry, I forgot to add one thing. I reviewed the primer sequence for secondary structure. It appears as though the forward primer has a 5 base compliment to itself (CTGCA). This likely accounts for the higher potential of primer dimer. Probably not to big of a concern. The reverse primer actually ha...
by DougB
Wed Apr 18, 2012 2:22 pm
Forum: Molecular Biology
Topic: DO NOT UNDERSTAND PRIMER DESIGN
Replies: 4
Views: 5095

Sorry I was not able to respond to your question earlier. Unfortunately, I just joined. Hopefully I still could provide some assistance. There are several guidelines for designing primers for PCR or sequencing. (1) The primer length should range 18 to 22 bases. Your primers are 21 bases in length an...
by DougB
Mon Apr 16, 2012 8:25 pm
Forum: Genetics
Topic: Sequencing Primers
Replies: 4
Views: 5858

An early method used to determine an unknown DNA sequence was restriction mapping. Restriction enzymes are typically found in bacteria. These special enzymes will "cut" DNA into two pieces only where a specific DNA sequence is found. The DNA sequence could be 4 to 8 bases in length dependi...