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Wasp

wasp

(Science: zoology) Any one of numerous species of stinging hymenopterous insects, especially. Any of the numerous species of the genus vespa, which includes the true, or social, wasps, some of which are called yellow jackets.

The social wasps make a complex series of combs, of a substance like stiff paper, often of large size, and protect them by a paperlike covering. The larvae are reared in the cells of the combs, and eat insects and insect larvae brought to them by the adults, but the latter feed mainly on the honey and pollen of flowers, and on the sweet juices of fruit. Digger wasp, any one of numerous species of solitary wasps that make their nests in burrows which they dig in the ground, as the sand wasps. See Sand wasp, under Sand. Mud wasp. See Mud. Potter wasp. See Potter. Wasp fly, a species of fly resembling a wasp, but without a sting.

Origin: OE. Waspe, AS. Waeps, waefs; akin to D. Wesp, G. Wespe, OHG. Wafsa, wefsa, Lith. Vapsa gadfly, Russ. Osa wasp, L. Vespa, and perhaps to E. Weave.


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Gene knockdowns in the wasp Nasonia vitripennis

This paper describes gene knockdowns in the wasp Nasonia vitripennis by Morpholino antisense oligos, delivered by microinjection. Dual mode of embryonic development is highlighted by expression and function of Nasonia pair-rule genes. Rosenberg ...

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by jonmoulton
Fri Mar 07, 2014 5:57 pm
 
Forum: Molecular Biology
Topic: Gene knockdowns in the wasp Nasonia vitripennis
Replies: 0
Views: 1021

The Himalayan Snowcock in Nevada

... to shoot, and has never reached pest proportions in its place of origin it's OK. I would certainly be against the introduction of a parasitic wasp. It might decide to prey on loads of rare and beneficial insects in its new habitat, and once thriving would be impossible to eradicate, worse ...

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by animartco
Mon Aug 05, 2013 12:50 pm
 
Forum: Ecology
Topic: The Himalayan Snowcock in Nevada
Replies: 3
Views: 6063

The Himalayan Snowcock in Nevada

... introduced). I live in Virginia, and our area is beset with Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs. USDA is testing certain species of exotic parasitoid wasp which control the BMSBs in their native Asian environments. These little wasps would be heartily welcomed by those of us with a BMSB problem, and ...

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by vacohee
Sun Jun 10, 2012 4:55 pm
 
Forum: Ecology
Topic: The Himalayan Snowcock in Nevada
Replies: 3
Views: 6063

Evolution of itch

... is not that a handful of them are poisonous (only very few are poisonous enough to cause serious damage, and smacking a poisonous insect like a wasp is a bad idea anyway, since it usually just provokes a painful sting). What I think instead is that many arthropods are parasitic themselves, or ...

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by biohazard
Wed Mar 07, 2012 10:10 am
 
Forum: Evolution
Topic: Evolution of itch
Replies: 3
Views: 2740

Re: Camouflage in nature

... and 1 of them is not poisonous but mimics a bunch of characteristics (colors, patterns, shape, behavior, etc…) of 1 of the 9 poisonous bugs (a wasp, for example) for its protection. How the development of these features can be modeled? I guess that mutations of our bug can be simulated by some ...

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by Nick7
Fri Dec 16, 2011 11:38 pm
 
Forum: Evolution
Topic: Camouflage in nature
Replies: 16
Views: 12454
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