Dictionary » W » Walnut

Walnut

walnut

(Science: botany) The fruit or nut of any tree of the genus juglans; also, the tree, and its timber. The seven or eight known species are all natives of the north temperate zone.

In some parts of America, especially in new England, the name walnut is given to several species of hickory (Carya), and their fruit. Ash-leaved walnut, a tree (juglans fraxinifolia), native in transcaucasia. Black walnut, a North American tree (J. Nigra) valuable for its purplish brown wood, which is extensively used in cabinetwork and for gunstocks. The nuts are thick-shelled, and nearly globular. English, or European, walnut, a tree (J. Regia), native of asia from the Caucasus to japan, valuable for its timber and for its excellent nuts, which are also called madeira nuts. Walnut brown, a deep warm brown colour, like that of the heartwood of the black walnut. Walnut oil, oil extracted from walnut meats. It is used in cooking, making soap, etc. White walnut, a North American tree (J. Cinerea), bearing long, oval, thick-shelled, oily nuts, commonly called butternuts. See Butternut.

Origin: OE. Walnot, AS. Wealh-hnutu a Welsh or foreign nut, a walnut; wealh foreign, strange, n, a Welshman, Celt (akin to OHG. Walh, properly, a Celt, from the name of a Celtic tribe, in L. Volcae) _ hnutu a nut; akin to D. Walnoot, G. Walnuss, Icel. Valhnot, Sw. Valnot, Dan valnod. See Nut, and cf. Welsh.


Please contribute to this project, if you have more information about this term feel free to edit this page



Results from our forum


Does smashing walnuts kills the pests that invade it?

If you smash a walnut with eggs of a pest already laid in it, or on it, and throw it away on the ground, can these eggs still hatch, and live, and for how long is that possible. I know it is an odd question, but indulge me please, ...

See entire post
by astralus
Thu Jul 12, 2012 2:33 am
 
Forum: Zoology Discussion
Topic: Does smashing walnuts kills the pests that invade it?
Replies: 1
Views: 1931

One tree: The effects of cloning trees on their reproduction

... Natalie Jeremijenko who created a project she called "One Tree". They cloned thousands of genetically identical seedlings of the paradox walnut tree derived from cell cultures of a single plant. These clones were initially grown in a lab and experienced the same environmental conditions ...

See entire post
by sableg
Thu Dec 10, 2009 5:13 pm
 
Forum: Botany Discussion
Topic: One tree: The effects of cloning trees on their reproduction
Replies: 3
Views: 2858

Genetics Problems... Friends i need ur help

... plz....friends do it n explain me in detail how u did. #1. The presence of dominant alleles at two different loci (A--B--) in poultry results in a walnut comb. Pea comb is produced by the genotype aaB--, rose comb by A--bb, and single comb by aabb. If you were given a rooster with a walnut comb, ...

See entire post
by hemu0912
Wed Jul 15, 2009 4:06 am
 
Forum: Genetics
Topic: Genetics Problems... Friends i need ur help
Replies: 5
Views: 5243

Re: Humans, Apes, Birds, and Intimidation

... can understand complex concepts with ease, yet they cannot use language or speech at all. My question is, how can birds with brains the size of a walnut possibly mimic or, more specifially, need to mimic speech and sounds, and why is speech not seen in any other apes, even though they are more ...

See entire post
by David George
Tue Jan 09, 2007 9:21 am
 
Forum: Zoology Discussion
Topic: Humans, Apes, Birds, and Intimidation
Replies: 13
Views: 6745

Humans, Apes, Birds, and Intimidation

... can understand complex concepts with ease, yet they cannot use language or speech at all. My question is, how can birds with brains the size of a walnut possibly mimic or, more specifially, need to mimic speech and sounds, and why is speech not seen in any other apes, even though they are more ...

See entire post
by Skeletor Rinpoche
Sun Jan 07, 2007 7:50 am
 
Forum: Zoology Discussion
Topic: Humans, Apes, Birds, and Intimidation
Replies: 13
Views: 6745
View all matching forum results

This page was last modified 21:16, 3 October 2005. This page has been accessed 2,492 times. 
What links here | Related changes | Permanent link