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Vocal

vocal

1. A vocal sound; specifically, a purely vocal element of speech, unmodified except by resonance; a vowel or a diphthong; a tonic element; a tonic; distinguished from a subvocal, and a nonvocal.

2. A man who has a right to vote in certain elections.

Origin: Cf. F. Vocal, LL. Vocalis.

1. Of or pertaining to the voice or speech; having voice; endowed with utterance; full of voice, or voices. To hill or valley, fountain, or fresh shade, Made vocal by my song. (milton)

2. Uttered or modulated by the voice; oral; as, vocal melody; vocal prayer. Vocal worship.

3. Of or pertaining to a vowel or voice sound; also, poken with tone, intonation, and resonance; sonant; sonorous; said of certain articulate sounds.

4. Consisting of, or characterised by, voice, or tone produced in the larynx, which may be modified, either by resonance, as in the case of the vowels, or by obstructive action, as in certain consonants, such as v, l, etc, or by both, as in the nasals m, n, ng; sonant; intonated; voiced. See Voice, and Vowel, also guide to Pronunciation, 199-202. Of or pertaining to a vowel; having the character of a vowel; vowel. Vocal cords or chords.

(Science: anatomy) The part of the air passages above the inferior ligaments of the larynx, including the passages through the nose and mouth.

Origin: L. Vocalis, fr. Vox, vocis, voice: cf. F. Vocal. See Voice, and cf. Vowel.


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Re:

1) sound is made in vocal cords, not in lungs Yes sound is made in the vocal cords, which are parts of the larynx...by vibrating air expelled from the lungs. Sound can also be made by the esophagus, which is known as esophageal speech, ...

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by NMLevesque
Wed Nov 20, 2013 10:10 pm
 
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: Are bidirectional lungs essential for human speech?
Replies: 3
Views: 2433

Are bidirectional lungs essential for human speech?

1) sound is made in vocal cords, not in lungs 2) I'd call (if at all) rather bird lungs as bidirectional and mammal lungs as unidirectional

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by JackBean
Wed Nov 20, 2013 7:22 pm
 
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: Are bidirectional lungs essential for human speech?
Replies: 3
Views: 2433

Why are animals so quiet?

... often communicate by means other than sound. Scents for example are often used more than sounds for communication even in animals that do use vocal signals as well: wild canines are a good example. In wolf packs, alpha females often can tell her pack members what to do by ear movements, teeth ...

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by Wallyanna
Wed May 09, 2012 11:28 am
 
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: Why are animals so quiet?
Replies: 4
Views: 2812

Re: The human head and the concentration of sensory devices

... so more specific questions which possibly are somewhere on the web but couldn't really manage to get answers for: -Is there a clear reason why the vocal tract is combined with the mouth, does this offer any survival advantage of is it perhaps just a energy optimisation? - is there a reason why ...

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by sameram
Sun Apr 29, 2012 10:45 pm
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: The human head and the concentration of sensory devices
Replies: 3
Views: 2243

The human head and the concentration of sensory devices

... understand if there are any clear theories/explanations or evolutionary evidence on how come the: Eyes: visual sense Nose: olfactory Ears: hearing Vocal tract: food + speech somehow all happened to evolve in a very small locality in the human body. Is this the case with all primates? or animals? ...

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by sameram
Sun Apr 29, 2012 7:22 pm
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: The human head and the concentration of sensory devices
Replies: 3
Views: 2243
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