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Verapamil

verapamil

(Science: drug) A calcium channel blocking drug, used as a coronary vasodilator and antiarrhythmic.

pharmacologic action: calcium channel blockade, direct, potent negative chronotrope and inotrope, slows conduction in AV node, systemic and coronary vasodilation.

uses: supraventricular tachycardias.

dose: 2.5 - 5.0 mg iV over 1-2 minutes May repeat at 5.0 - 10 mg every 15-30 minutes until 30 mg total dose.

Onset: 3 - 5 min.

potential complications: hypotension due to vasodilation and depressed contractility. Treat with calcium; bradycardia, AV block can be exacerbated, contraindicated with congestive heart failure, synergistic interaction with beta blockers.

note: administration of verapamil to a patient with ventricular tachycardia can be lethal. Verapamil can accelerate heart rate and decrease blood pressure, especially in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-white and wide-complex tachycardia.


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Biology Experts, Help!

For the question number 4, it's the responsibility of the nurse to determine the BP before giving the verapamil because it's not supposed to be given if the client's BP is low. It would remarkably affect the client's status definitely. It's helpful that you check/search further ...

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by mcar
Wed Jun 10, 2009 9:58 am
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: Biology Experts, Help!
Replies: 5
Views: 9651

Biology Experts, Help!

... cause of barbs symptoms. 4. Beth Wood tells her nursing students that it is important to monitor patients' blood pressure when they are receiving verapamil (a calcium channel blocker). Why? Any help is appreciated. I understand if your too busy. Thanks in advance!

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by SuGrad
Wed Jun 10, 2009 4:11 am
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: Biology Experts, Help!
Replies: 5
Views: 9651

Na/K ATP-ase Reversal

... beta blockers (reduce b1 adrenoreceptor activation), nitric vasodilators (venous dilation, reduce preload), calcium receptor antagonists (e.g. verapamil reduced afterload)...etc. but cardiac glycosides like digoxin increase heart workload... doesn't this make angina worse in the long run?... ...

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by Revenged
Sat Feb 24, 2007 10:47 pm
 
Forum: Cell Biology
Topic: Na/K ATP-ase Reversal
Replies: 5
Views: 4612


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