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Trees

trees

woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (angiosperms, gymnosperms, and some pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.


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Arctic Parkas - Surviving The Winter 'Inuit Style'

Toward summer one beautiful and treacherous vine will visit these trees. The the Poison Ivy vine. It grows incredibly well here alone the river side. The leaves can be incredibly high. Although I am one on the fifty percent who are allergic for the leaves, ...

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by goosecanadaca
Sat Oct 04, 2014 8:07 pm
 
Forum: Molecular Biology
Topic: Arctic Parkas - Surviving The Winter 'Inuit Style'
Replies: 0
Views: 14

Phylogeny and haplotype mapping programs

Hello! I have previously used MGEA for my phylogenetic analysis and draw evolutionary trees. In this project, I have a certain number of haplotypes, I have to calculate distances. What is the most common, acceptable, free to use program for haplotype mapping? What ...

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by sevdakara
Tue Jul 15, 2014 8:29 pm
 
Forum: Ecology
Topic: Phylogeny and haplotype mapping programs
Replies: 0
Views: 334

Re: Is DNA living or non-living thing?? get the answer here

... introduced by Abraham (2117-1942 BCE) from the Casdites-Babylonians, in whom it was evoked by the sight of the apparently "praying" palm trees, with their palm-like leaves, rewarded with "God's gift", in Persian "Bagdad" (bag=god, dad=dat hence date-fruit, data= given/gift. ...

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by Dov Henis
Fri Jul 04, 2014 8:00 am
 
Forum: Molecular Biology
Topic: Is DNA living or non-living thing?? get the answer here
Replies: 26
Views: 57194

wildlife gardening

... the most beautiful can't be also the most useful but I would dispute this. I think that this fad for placing the emphasis on planting 'native' trees and shrubs rather than ornamental varieties is wildly misplaced. There are plenty of 'native' trees and shrubs out in the wild, but their disadvantage ...

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by animartco
Sun May 18, 2014 12:26 pm
 
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: wildlife gardening
Replies: 0
Views: 837

Why does the floem gets affected when the bark gets damaged?

... of dead cells. The xylem are on the inside of the vascular bundles, and eventually are used to create the dead heartwood at the centre of the trees. This means the phloem are always on the outside the trunk, just beneath the periderm (bark). If you take off the bark, you are likely to damage ...

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by Babybel56
Fri Feb 28, 2014 9:27 am
 
Forum: Botany Discussion
Topic: Why does the floem gets affected when the bark gets damaged?
Replies: 2
Views: 1796
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