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Transport

Transport

(Science: radiobiology) refers to processes which cause heat Energy, or particles, or something else, to flow out of the plasma and cease being confined. Diffusion partly determines the rate of transport. Energy losses from a plasma due to transport processes are a central problem in fusion energy research.

See: classical transport, neoclassical transport, anomalous tranport, diffusion, ambipolar diffusion, bohm diffusion, classical diffusion, neoclassical diffusion, anomalous diffusion, energy transport, ripple transport. Something that serves as a means of transportation.An exchange of molecules (and their kinetic energy and momentum) across the boundary between adjacent layers of a fluid or across cell membranes.The movement of a given structure from one location to another.


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Why does the floem gets affected when the bark gets damaged?

... phloem is basically part of the bark, so whenever you damage the bark down to the wood, you're destroing also the phloem. However, phloem doesn't transport nutrients (and it definitely doesn't transport glucose) from leaves only to the roots. In reality, very young leaves function as sink instead ...

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by JackBean
Fri Feb 28, 2014 3:15 pm
 
Forum: Botany Discussion
Topic: Why does the floem gets affected when the bark gets damaged?
Replies: 2
Views: 231

Why does the floem gets affected when the bark gets damaged?

... on the outside the trunk, just beneath the periderm (bark). If you take off the bark, you are likely to damage the phloem as well. The phloem transport glucose from where it is produced (the leaves) to the roots so they can continue to grow.

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by Babybel56
Fri Feb 28, 2014 9:27 am
 
Forum: Botany Discussion
Topic: Why does the floem gets affected when the bark gets damaged?
Replies: 2
Views: 231

Too many ions inside a neuron cell. What happens?

Since it's passive transport, the concentration will never be higher than in extracellular space.

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by JackBean
Tue Feb 25, 2014 9:20 am
 
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: Too many ions inside a neuron cell. What happens?
Replies: 1
Views: 642

Re:

... from glycolysis (2 per 1 Glc) and could be additional 200 from TCA (1 per 1 acetyl-CoA). The TCA or Krebs cycle only occurs if the ETC(electron transport chain) can occur and that is only with oxygen(and nothing keeping oxygen from binding such as cyanide). so the answer to your question would ...

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by caters
Mon Feb 03, 2014 4:37 am
 
Forum: Cell Biology
Topic: ATP produced by human cells in an anaerobic chamber. LOST!
Replies: 2
Views: 1656

Diffusion and concentration gradient

I think this is the result of neural regulation. Transport and the distribution of related molecules is completed under the control of the brain via some specific receptor proteins .

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by Arlen1991
Sun Dec 15, 2013 7:10 am
 
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: Diffusion and concentration gradient
Replies: 7
Views: 2488
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