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Time

time

1. Duration, considered independently of any system of measurement or any employment of terms which designate limited portions thereof. The time wasteth [i. E. Passes away] night and day. (Chaucer) I know of no ideas . . . That have a better claim to be accounted simple and original than those of space and time. (Reid)

2. A particular period or part of duration, whether past, present, or future; a point or portion of duration; as, the time was, or has been; the time is, or will be. God, who at sundry times and in divers manners spake in time past unto the fathers by the prophets. (Heb. I. 1)

3. The period at which any definite event occurred, or person lived; age; period; era; as, the spanish Armada was destroyed in the time of queen Elizabeth; often in the plural; as, ancient times; modern times.

4. The duration of one's life; the hours and days which a person has at his disposal. Believe me, your time is not your own; it belongs to god, to religion, to mankind. (Buckminster)

5. A proper time; a season; an opportunity. There is . . . A time to every purpose. (Eccl. Iii. 1) The time of figs was not yet. (mark xi. 13)

6. Hour of travail, delivery, or parturition. She was within one month of her time. (Clarendon)

7. Performance or occurrence of an action or event, considered with reference to repetition; addition of a number to itself; repetition; as, to double cloth four times; four times four, or sixteen. Summers three times eight save one. (milton)

8. The present life; existence in this world as contrasted with immortal life; definite, as contrasted with infinite, duration. Till time and sin together cease. (Keble)

9. Tense.

10. The measured duration of sounds; measure; tempo; rate of movement; rhythmical division; as, common or triple time; the musician keeps good time. Some few lines set unto a solemn time. (Beau. & Fl)

Time is often used in the formation of compounds, mostly self-explaining; as, time-battered, time-beguiling, time-consecrated, time-consuming, time-enduring, time-killing, time-sanctioned, time-scorner, time-wasting, time-worn, etc. Absolute time, time irrespective of local standards or epochs; as, all spectators see a lunar eclipse at the same instant of absolute time. Apparent time, the time of day reckoned by the sun, or so that 12 o'clock at the place is the instant of the transit of the sun's center over the meridian. Astronomical time, mean solar time reckoned by counting the hours continuously up to twenty-four from one noon to the next. At times, at distinct intervals of duration; now and then; as, at times he reads, at other times he rides. Civil time, time as reckoned for the purposes of common life in distinct periods, as years, months, days, hours, etc, the latter, among most modern nations, being divided into two series of twelve each, and reckoned, the first series from midnight to noon, the second, from noon to midnight. Common time Apparent time as reckoned from the transit of the sun's center over the meridian.

1. To appoint the time for; to bring, begin, or perform at the proper season or time; as, he timed his appearance rightly. There is no greater wisdom than well to time the beginnings and onsets of things. (bacon)

2. To regulate as to time; to accompany, or agree with, in time of movement. Who overlooked the oars, and timed the stroke. (Addison) He was a thing of blood, whose every motion Was timed with dying cries. (Shak)

3. To ascertain or record the time, duration, or rate of; as, to time the speed of horses, or hours for workmen.

4. To measure, as in music or harmony.

Origin: OE. Time, AS. Tima, akin to tid time, and to Icel. Timi, Dan. Time an hour, Sw. Timme. 58. See Tide.


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