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Suckers

sucker

1. One who, or that which, sucks; especially, one of the organs by which certain animals, as the octopus and remora, adhere to other bodies.

2. A suckling; a sucking animal.

3. The embolus, or bucket, of a pump; also, the valve of a pump basket.

4. A pipe through which anything is drawn.

5. A small piece of leather, usually round, having a string attached to the center, which, when saturated with water and pressed upon a stone or other body having a smooth surface, adheres, by reason of the atmospheric pressure, with such force as to enable a considerable weight to be thus lifted by the string; used by children as a plaything.

6. (Science: botany) A shoot from the roots or lower part of the stem of a plant; so called, perhaps, from diverting nourishment from the body of the plant.

7. (Science: zoology) Any one of numerous species of North American fresh water cyprinoid fishes of the family Catostomidae; so called because the lips are protrusile. The flesh is coarse, and they are of little value as food. The most common species of the Eastern united states are the northern sucker (Catostomus Commersoni), the white sucker (C. Teres), the hog sucker (C. Nigricans), and the chub, or sweet sucker (Erimyzon sucetta). Some of the large western species are called buffalo fish, red horse, black horse, and suckerel. The remora.

The lumpfish.

The hagfish, or myxine.

A California food fish (Menticirrus undulatus) closely allied to the kingfish; called also bagre.

8. A parasite; a sponger. See def. 6, above. They who constantly converse with men far above their estates shall reap shame and loss thereby; if thou payest nothing, they will count thee a sucker, no branch. (Fuller)

9. A hard drinker; a soaker.

10. A greenhorn; one easily gulled.

11. A nickname applied to a native of illinois. Carp sucker, Cherry sucker, etc. See Carp, Cherry, etc. Sucker fish. See sucking fish, under Sucking. Sucker rod, a pump rod. See Pump.

(Science: zoology) Sucker tube, one of the external ambulacral tubes of an echinoderm, usually terminated by a sucker and used for locomotion. Called also sucker foot. See spatangoid.


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Why bother conserving species?

... the pollinators. The weeders, and the meaters. The airborne and the treeborne. The bio composers and the decomposers. The CO2 scrubbers and the O2 suckers. Needless to say, the list goes on :)

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by MichaelXY
Mon Jan 12, 2009 7:43 am
 
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Green Mosquito===Photos Available

Normaly male Anopheles mosquito are sap suckers so these may look green. But A mutant or natural green mosquito is green right from head to codal end.

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by sachin
Mon Aug 25, 2008 10:35 am
 
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Protein Music

. Protein Music Who knew those little suckers could sing? :) Robert K.

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by robertkernodle
Thu May 17, 2007 10:06 pm
 
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The Fiber Disease

... THERE ARE INSECTS GROWING INSIDE OF ME" scam guys? You know P.T. Barnum said that there is a sucker born every minute. That leaves a lot of suckers for you, but Randy is reporting a lot of new registrants. Maybe people just trust doctors more than anonymous scamers.

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by mfromcanada
Tue Jan 16, 2007 5:16 pm
 
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The Fiber Disease

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by Frank N Stein
Tue Jan 16, 2007 5:08 pm
 
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