Stable

stable

1. Firmly established; not easily moved, shaken, or overthrown; fixed; as, a stable government. In this region of chance, . . . Where nothing is stable. (Rogers)

2. Steady in purpose; constant; firm in resolution; not easily diverted from a purpose; not fickle or wavering; as, a man of stable character. And to her husband ever meek and stable. (Chaucer)

3. Durable; not subject to overthrow or change; firm; as, a stable foundation; a stable position.

(Science: mechanics) Stable equibrium, the kind of equilibrium of a body so placed that if disturbed it returns to its former position, as in the case when the center of gravity is below the point or axis of support; opposed to unstable equilibrium, in which the body if disturbed does not tend to return to its former position, but to move farther away from it, as in the case of a body supported at a point below the center of gravity. Cf. Neutral equilibrium, under Neutral.

Synonym: fixed, steady, constant, abiding, strong, durable, firm.

Origin: OE. Estable, F. Stable, fr. L. Stabilis, fr. Stare to stand. See Stand, and cf. Establish.

A house, shed, or building, for beasts to lodge and feed in; especially, a building or apartment with stalls, for horses; as, a horse stable; a cow stable.

(Science: zoology) Stable fly, a common dipterous fly (stomoxys calcitrans) which is abundant about stables and often enters dwellings, especially in autumn. These files, unlike the common house files, which they resemble, bite]] severely, and are troublesome to horses and cattle.

Origin: OF. Estable, F. Etable, from L. Stabulum, fr. Stare to stand. See Stand.


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