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Speech

speech

1. The faculty of uttering articulate sounds or words; the faculty of expressing thoughts by words or articulate sounds; the power of speaking. There is none comparable to the variety of instructive expressions by speech, wherewith man alone is endowed for the communication of his thoughts. (Holder)

2. He act of speaking; that which is spoken; words, as expressing ideas; language; conversation.

Speech is voice modulated by the throat, tongue, lips, etc, the modulation being accomplished by changing the form of the cavity of the mouth and nose through the action of muscles which move their walls. O goode God! how gentle and how kind Ye seemed by your speech and your visage The day that maked was our marriage. (Chaucer) The acts of god . . . To human ears Can nort without process of speech be told. (milton)

3. A particular language, as distinct from others; a tongue; a dialect. People of a strange speech and of an hard language. (Ezek. Iii. 6)

4. Talk; mention; common saying. The duke . . . Did of me demand What was the speech among the Londoners Concerning the french journey. (Shak)

5. Formal discourse in public; oration; harangue. The constant design of these orators, in all their speeches, was to drive some one particular point. (swift)

6. Ny declaration of thoughts. I. With leave of speech implored, . . . Replied. (milton)

Synonym: Harangue, language, address, oration. See Harangue, and Language.

Origin: OE. Speche, AS. Spc, spr, fr. Specan, sprecan, to spe 3e6 ak; akin to D. Spraak speech, OHG. Sprahha, G. Sprache, Sw. Sprk, Dan. Sprog. See Speak.


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Re:

... experienced the suppression of critical thought that created emotion based arguments like yours. It's actually people like you who suppress speech. One of your pet tactics is to describe as a liberal anyone with a sensible, scientifically correct view of these matters. Or you'll claim there's ...

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by Seth90210
Sun Jan 26, 2014 1:46 am
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: Brain size=IQ level theory (Blacks vs Whites & Asians)
Replies: 72
Views: 263495

Are bidirectional lungs essential for human speech?

As of point 2, I stand corrected. As of point 1, I still think the lungs have not much (if anything at all) to do with speech.

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by JackBean
Fri Nov 22, 2013 1:14 pm
 
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: Are bidirectional lungs essential for human speech?
Replies: 3
Views: 2531

Re:

... which are parts of the larynx...by vibrating air expelled from the lungs. Sound can also be made by the esophagus, which is known as esophageal speech, which is an alternative to using an electrolarynx for person's without a larynx. So vocal cords aren't even technically required for speech. ...

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by NMLevesque
Wed Nov 20, 2013 10:10 pm
 
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: Are bidirectional lungs essential for human speech?
Replies: 3
Views: 2531

Are bidirectional lungs essential for human speech?

... part to supplementary air sacs), and wondered what effect having a similar system, or really any sort of unidirectional lungs, would have on human speech. As far as I know we have somewhat more precise control over our 'breath' than chimps, and due to certain morphological differences are better ...

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by NMLevesque
Tue Nov 19, 2013 10:53 pm
 
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: Are bidirectional lungs essential for human speech?
Replies: 3
Views: 2531

experiences occur separately?

... with a machine that induces a blindsight condition by inhibiting a mediating pathway, a pathway connecting the visual cortex to the centers for speech and higher cognition. First, there is firing in the visual cortex. After that happens, the machine reacts very quickly, choosing whether to inhibit ...

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by wildfunguy
Wed Oct 09, 2013 2:25 pm
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: experiences occur separately?
Replies: 2
Views: 1276
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