Sound

sound

The air bladder of a fish; as, cod sounds are an esteemed article of food.

Origin: AS. Sund a swimming, akin to E. Swim. See Swim.

1. Whole; unbroken; unharmed; free from flaw, defect, or decay; perfect of the kind; as, sound timber; sound fruit; a sound tooth; a sound ship.

2. Healthy; not diseased; not being in a morbid state; said of body or mind; as, a sound body; a sound constitution; a sound understanding.

3. Firm; strong; safe. The brasswork here, how rich it is in beams, And how, besides, it makes the whole house sound. (Chapman)

4. Free from error; correct; right; honest; true; faithful; orthodox; said of persons; as, a sound lawyer; a sound thinker. Do not I know you a favorer Of this new seat? Ye are nor sound. (Shak)

5. Founded in truth or right; supported by justice; not to be overthrown on refuted; not fallacious; as, sound argument or reasoning; a sound objection; sound doctrine; sound principles. Hold fast the form of sound words, which thou hast heard of me. (2 Tim. I. 13)

6. Heavy; laid on with force; as, a sound beating.

7. Undisturbed; deep; profound; as, sound sleep.

8. Founded in law; legal; valid; not defective; as, a sound title to land.

Sound is sometimes used in the formation of self-explaining compounds; as, sound-headed, sound-hearted, sound-timbered, etc. Sound currency, a currency whose actual value is the same as its nominal value; a currency which does not deteriorate or depreciate or fluctuate in comparision with the standard of values.

Origin: OE. Sound, AS. Sund; akin to D. Gezond, G. Gesund, OHG. Gisunt, Dan. & Sw. Sund, and perhaps to L. Sanus. Cf. Sane.

(Science: geography) A narrow passage of water, or a strait between the mainland and an island; also, a strait connecting two seas, or connecting a sea or lake with the ocean; as, the Sound between the Baltic and the german Ocean; long Island Sound. The Sound of Denmark, where ships pay toll. (Camden) Sound dues, tolls formerly imposed by Denmark on vessels passing through the Baltic Sound.

Origin: AS. Sund a narrow sea or strait; akin to Icel, Sw, Dan. & G. Sund, probably so named because it could be swum across. See Swim.

(Science: zoology) A cuttlefish.

1. To measure the depth of; to fathom; especially, to ascertain the depth of by means of a line and plummet.

2. To ascertain, or try to ascertain, the thoughts, motives, and purposes of (a person); to examine; to try; to test; to probe. I was in jest, And by that offer meant to sound your breast. (Dryden) I've sounded my numidians man by man. (Addison)

3. (Science: medicine) To explore, as the bladder or urethra, with a sound; to examine with a sound; also, to examine by auscultation or percussion; as, to sound a patient.

Origin: F. Sonder; cf. AS. Sundgyrd a sounding rod, sundline a sounding line (see Sound a narrow passage of water).

(Science: medicine) Any elongated instrument or probe, usually metallic, by which cavities of the body are sounded or explored, especially the bladder for stone, or the urethra for a stricture.

Origin: F. Sonde. See Sound to fathom.


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