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Soles

sole

1. The bottom of the foot; hence, also, rarely, the foot itself. The dove found no rest for the sole of her foot. (gen. Viii. 9) Hast wandered through the world now long a day, yet ceasest not thy weary soles to lead. (Spenser)

2. The bottom of a shoe or boot, or the piece of leather which constitutes the bottom. The caliga was a military shoe, with a very thick sole, tied above the instep. (Arbuthnot)

3. The bottom or lower part of anything, or that on which anything rests in standing. Specifially: The seat or bottom of a mine; applied to horizontal veins or lodes. Sole leather, thick, strong, used for making the soles of boots and shoes, and for other purposes.

Origin: AS. Sole, fr. L. Soolea (or rather an assumed L. Sola), akin to solumround, soil, sole of the foot. Cf. Exile, Saloon, Soil earth, Sole the fish.

(Science: zoology) Any one of several species of flatfishes of the genus Solea and allied genera of the family Soleidae, especially the common European species (Solea vulgaris), which is a valuable food fish.

Any one of several American flounders somewhat resembling the true sole in form or quality, as the California sole (Lepidopsetta bilineata), the long-finned sole (Glyptocephalus zachirus), and other species.

(Science: zoology) lemon, or french, sole, the megrim.

Origin: F. Sole, L. Solea; so named from its flat shape. See Sole of the foot.


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Re: Molecules entering the bloodstream from skin absorption

... applications, but also when ingested or applied directly to the skin. But yeah, I can't find anything that talks about absorption through the soles of the feet that has any scientific backing. I found this discussion: http://ceaccp.oxfordjournals.org/content/7/5/171.full which discusses skin ...

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by maymayrays
Fri Dec 07, 2012 4:24 am
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: Molecules entering the bloodstream from skin absorption
Replies: 2
Views: 13941

Molecules entering the bloodstream from skin absorption

... aromatherapy classes and books that the pores on the feet are larger than any other part of your body and that when you put essential oils on the soles of your feet you are able to get to the bloodstream the fastest (second only to inhalation). I just don't see the Biological or Chemical proof ...

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by watermelonstand
Wed Jul 11, 2012 11:42 pm
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: Molecules entering the bloodstream from skin absorption
Replies: 2
Views: 13941

Perspiration among carnivores [mammals].

... licking. h t t p :// www .hindu. com/seta/2005/05/26/stories/2005052600351700. htm: In cats, rats and mice they (sweat glands) are confined to the soles of the feet. In rabbits, they are around the lips; in bats on the sides of the head; in cattle on the muzzle; in hippo on the pinnae. Hippos and ...

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by thehundredthone
Tue Mar 27, 2007 6:10 am
 
Forum: Zoology Discussion
Topic: Perspiration among carnivores [mammals].
Replies: 11
Views: 8658

The Fiber Disease

... skin, and easily hides any where on the body. Common places to hide – nails underneath, sides of nails (appearing like a hang-nail), under soles of feet (in tracks), heel of the foot (almost like a crusted scabie), legs, arms, rump, back, face, hair – with tracks the thickness of a nail ...

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by Neva Borden
Sun Dec 03, 2006 1:13 pm
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: The Fiber Disease
Replies: 7403
Views: 5479044

The Fiber Disease

... and appear on exposed parts of the body, such as face, neck, arms, legs. Younger children may have rashes on their scalps. Diaper areas, palms and soles are not affected. The trunk is rarely affected. By contrast, scabies causes rashes on palms, soles and between toes and fingers. C for Clusters ...

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by London
Fri Aug 25, 2006 10:49 am
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: The Fiber Disease
Replies: 7403
Views: 5479044
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